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SWEATOPEDIA

Sweatopedia is a leading source of comprehensive, objective, and accurate information on hyperhidrosis.

Antiperspirant

What You Need to Know About Carpe Clinical Regimen

By Katie Crissman /

One of the newest clinical strength antiperspirants to hit the market is Carpe’s Clinical Grade Regimen - it combines several high performing products with a specific care routine to provide long term sweat reduction for even the heaviest sweaters. Read on to see if Carpe Clinical Regimen is right for you!

Antiperspirant is great - for most people. You apply it once a day and it stops your sweat! It’s easy. But, what if that’s not what happened? You bought it, read the label, and used it exactly as directed and, unfortunately, you’re still sweating - excessively. If this is you, then you’ve come to the right place. There are products specifically made for heavy sweaters who haven’t had luck with traditional antiperspirants. These products typically include the words “extra strength”, “clinical strength” or “prescription strength” and they are, thankfully, available over the counter without a doctor’s prescription. 


The difference between clinical strength products and their weaker counterparts are the active ingredients they use. Clinical strength lines typically use one of several newer types of metallic salt ingredients that are known to be both stronger and less irritating than aluminum chloride (which is the standard active ingredient in antiperspirants) [1]. While there are many clinical strength products on the market, we are going to focus on a new clinical strength regimen that combines a strong active ingredient with a specific care routine to get excessive sweating under control. 


Carpe Clinical Regimen -  What It Is and How It’s Different

One of the newest clinical strength antiperspirants to hit the market is Carpe’s Clinical Grade Regimen. It’s different from other prescription grade products because it combines several strong products with a specific care routine to ensure maximum product performance. It’s also different from Carpe’s other products because it uses a stronger active ingredient and delivery system. The system is geared toward people who experience intractable armpit sweating, but Carpe also makes products for people who struggle with other types of sweat. The Carpe Clinical Grade Underarm includes three specific products that, when used together, have been found to be highly effective at reducing sweat production. These products include:

  • Carpe Clinical Grade Underarm Antiperspirant 
  • Carpe Clinical Grade Exfoliating Wash
  • Carpe Clinical Grade Underarm Wipes[2]

Carpe Clinical Grade Regimen uses an active ingredient called Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (20%) combined with other soothing inactive ingredients to effectively stop sweat in its tracks while reducing skin irritation.[3] Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex is a newer generation metallic salt that stops sweat production and is known to be more effective than other types of active ingredients antiperspirants typically use. One study mentioned in the journal Dermatologic Clinics found that antiperspirants using Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex were, on average, 34% more effective than antiperspirants that used aluminum chloride as an active ingredient.[1] Carpe’s traditional products use an active ingredient called Aluminum Sesquichlorohydrate at 15% which is effective, but less potent than Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex.[4]


It’s important to note that Carpe’s Clinical Grade Regimen provides a long term impact on sweat reduction from making short term lifestyle changes. This is because the results build up over time and peak at about 4 weeks. It takes 4 weeks of using the Carpe clinical grade products once each morning and every other night to see the full effect of what they can do. This is typical of all antiperspirants as their effects tend to build up with consistent use. Consistently using antiperspirant products is especially important for those with hard to treat sweat problems because it can be the difference between treatment success or failure.[1][2] 


If you’re frustrated with the way your current antiperspirant is working or how it isn’t working, then consider giving Carpe’s Clinical Grade Regimen a try! It’s active ingredient is comparable to other prescription strength products on the market but it’s multistep system with easy to use wipes is completely unique! Remember, an easy to use, consistent antiperspirant routine is going to give you long term sweat reduction so it’s important to find a system that works for your lifestyle. 


Sources
  1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0>https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
  2. How It Works (Clinical). Carpe. https://mycarpe.com/pages/how-it-works-clinical
  3. Clinical Underarm  PM Wipes. Carpe. https://mycarpe.com/products/clinical-grade-underarm-antiperspirant-wipes?variant=34814174724229
  4. Underarm Antiperspirant for Excessive Underarm Sweating. Carpe. https://mycarpe.com/products/underarm-antiperspirant-tube?variant=39247505358981
Antiperspirant

7 Effective Tips to Stop Sweaty Hands

By Daniel McCarthy /

7 Effective Tips to Stop Sweaty Hands 

Not sure how to stop sweaty hands and excessive sweating? You aren’t alone! Whether you’re working from home, gaming, or just trying to get your phone to recognize your thumbprint, it can get pretty dang annoying to constantly worry about how to stop having sweaty hands. In this article, we’ll cover 7 effective ways to help you stop sweaty hands:

    1. Reduce your stress
    2. Try (the right) antiperspirant
    3. Iontophoresis
    4. Check with your doctor about underlying conditions
    5. Medications
    6. Give a Botox shot 
    7. Take a more surgical approach

1.  Reduce your stress 

This one is often easier said than done - but it can help a lot. Research has shown that higher levels of anxiety cause sweat glands to become more active [1]. This is particularly true for hand sweating. 

Figuring out how to stop sweaty hands looks different for each person, but there are some relaxing activities that can either prevent sweat or help control it once it’s begun. Some possible activities to reduce your stress include listening to your favorite music, getting enough sleep, and exercising daily. Other helpful techniques include deep breathing and stretching. Everyone is different, so try some of these other tips to find what works best for you. 

2. Try (the right) antiperspirant

You’re relaxed, but maybe you’re still trying to work out how to stop having sweaty hands? While reducing stress is a beneficial home remedy, it should be combined with other easy-to-use remedies. Some home remedies, such as baking soda or apple cider vinegar, may help with hyperhidrosis, but the next best step is over-the-counter antiperspirant

Antiperspirants are great at preventing clam hands and often work better than deodorants to stop excessive sweating. Antiperspirants for hands are especially important in how to stop sweaty hands. Others prefer anti sweat wipes. Finding the right hand antiperspirant is an important step to combat sweaty hands. 

3. Iontophoresis

    Hate needles? Need to figure out how to stop sweaty hands? Iontophoresis may be for you. This method uses mild electrical currents to treat your hands while they’re submerged in water. And although iontophoresis sessions may be performed at a doctor’s office, some people choose to purchase their own iontophoresis machines for at-home treatment [2].  

    While this method can be a bit harder on the wallet, if you can pay upfront for a machine, you may save by avoiding paying for every visit to the doctors. However, if you don’t see progress after a few weeks, talk to your doctor to discuss how to stop your sweaty hands from affecting your daily life. 

    4. Check with your doctor about underlying conditions

    It can be easy to write off sweaty hands as a reaction to anxiety or nervousness. But sometimes sweaty hands can be caused by underlying conditions. These conditions might include diabetes, low blood sugar, overactive thyroid, infections, and other issues. To learn more on how to stop sweaty hands that may be connected to underlying conditions, it is best to talk to a medical professional about your hyperhidrosis needs. 

    5. Medications

    In addition to talking about your underlying conditions, a medical professional may also suggest a prescription to help with sweaty hands. More specifically, your dermatologist may prescribe an oral medication for hyperhidrosis like a series of pills known as anticholinergics, which help your body produce less sweat. Like pills, topical creams may also be prescribed to help reduce excessive sweating. These creams are made up of solutions that will decrease the amount of sweat released, including hand sweat. If medications don’t cut it for you, you may need to take one of the two steps below. 

    6. Give botox a shot

      You may be thinking, I’m not sure how to stop sweaty hands, so why are you recommending botox? While many may not associate botox with hyperhidrosis, it can significantly reduce excessive sweating, including in your hands [3] . While botox may solve how to stop having sweaty hands, this method can cause temporary pain or weakness of the hands, so it is crucial that you consult a medical professional for appropriate botox delivery. 

      7. Take a more surgical approach. This one is only for serious sweaters who have tried everything else.

      If you can’t figure out how to stop having sweaty hands after trying these first six tips, you might consider surgical treatment for primary focal hyperhidrosis. While botox is a less invasive surgery, significantly more invasive procedures include endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy​ or an endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy. These names may be hard to pronounce, but these surgeries can provide significant relief for people with certain kinds of severe hyperhidrosis. Of course, try less invasive options first, and talk to a medical professional before deciding to take a more surgical approach. 

      There may be no one-size-fits-all solution for how to stop sweaty hands, but hopefully one of, or a combo of these tips help you enjoy life a bit more and worry about sweat a bit less. 

      Sources

      1. Huddle, J. R. (2014). Hyperhidrosis: Causes, Treatment Options and Outcomes. New York, NY: Nova Science.
      2. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from <a href=https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0>https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0</a>
      3. Lakraj, A. A., Moghimi, N., & Jabbari, B. (2013). Hyperhidrosis: anatomy, pathophysiology and treatment with emphasis on the role of botulinum toxins. Toxins, 5(4), 821–840. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins5040821
      Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

      How to Stop Groin Sweat: 10 Ways to Deal with Crotch Sweat

      By JP Carter /

      Unfortunately, some people have to deal with excessive crotch sweat on a daily basis. 

      10 WAYS TO DEAL WITH GROIN SWEAT (AKA SWASS)

      1. The Right Underwear

      What you wear matters when it comes to excessive crotch sweat - especially what you wear under your clothes.

      The Key:

      DON'T DO: 

      • Overly tight
      • Non-breathable material
      • Polyester/synthetic fabrics

      DO:

      • Cotton or moisture wicking materials.
      • If extreme sweat, padded underwear which are made to absorb excess sweat

      2. Use Antiperspirant

      Using antiperspirant is one of the most effective things you can do to stop crotch sweat production.

      Antiperspirant works best when it is applied after a shower to dry skin before bed time, this allows it to sink into sweat glands and form a barrier that will be effective the next day. 

      3. Use Hygiene Hacks

      • Shower twice a day
      • Change your clothes any time sweating becomes excessive
      • Wash your groin in between changes
      • Keep baby wipes with you
      • Store extra underwear  [2][4]

      4. Apply Powder

      There are a few types of powder that can be useful when you have crotch sweat but they all serve to:

      • Absorb moisture
      • Reduce irritation
      • Prevent chafing
      • Reduce itching.

      It’s important to avoid powders that contain talc as it has been associated with the development of ovarian cancer when used by women.

      However, there are powders with bases like cornstarch or baking soda, among others.[5] Some brands, like Carpe, make powders that are specifically formulated for use on the groin and are considered to be safe.[6]

      5. Groom to Your Advantage

      While grooming your pubic region will not completely hinder crotch sweat production it may lessen how much you trap and make it easier to keep clean.

      Retaining some pubic hair may be to your advantage as it has the ability to reduce friction between clothing and skin and wick moisture away from the skin’s surface.

      However, keeping hair short and trimmed is recommended because this makes it less likely for bacteria, which are responsible for body odor, to stay trapped on the surface of the skin. It also makes your groin easier to clean so that hygienic practices are more effective.[2]

      6. Wear Loose Fitting Clothing

      This one may seem obvious, but wearing loose fitting clothing can make you less likely to sweat and keep the sweat you do produce from lingering on your skin.

      Tight fitting pants will raise the temperature of your groin and make crotch sweat worse.

      This applies to underwear as well, men may want to opt for boxers instead of briefs and women should probably avoid skin tight panties.[2]

      7. Try Relaxation Techniques

      For some people, anxiety can make groin sweating worse.[2]

      It is also known that anxiety is related to hyperhidrosis and relaxation techniques have had some success in helping people to control their symptoms[1].

      You may want to try biofeedback, mediation, yoga, or another type of relaxation activity to relax your mind and body.

      Relaxation by itself will not cure hyperhidrosis, but it can improve the symptoms and help you deal with the repercussions of having a stressful condition.

      8. Get Botox Injections

      When more conservative approaches have failed, it may be time to seek out medical intervention.

      Botox injections are known to stop the production of sweat and have successfully been used to treat crotch sweat.

      They are used to treat excessive sweating on other parts of the body like the armpits, hands, and feet. The effects of botox injections last between three and six months and they have been highly effective for some who use them.

      If you are interested in trying botox then make an appointment with a knowledgeable dermatologist.[1]

      9. Try Oral Medications

      Some doctors will prescribe medications to stop the body from producing as much sweat. Usually these medications come from a class of medications called anticholinergics. They can be helpful for some people but have the potential to cause undesirable side effects like dry mouth, constipation, nausea, drowsiness, and many others. This is because oral medications affect the whole body rather than just target the specific problem area. In some cases doctors may use antidepressants, beta blockers, or benzodiazepines to reduce anxiety and therefore improve the symptoms of hyperhidrosis.[1]

      10. Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle

      Sometimes excessive sweating can be worsened by a person’s lifestyle. This can be due to the fact that a person is obese, has a poorly treated underlying medical condition, or if they consume too much alcohol or caffeine. The symptoms of hyperhidrosis, or sweating in general, can be improved by taking steps to remedy these issues. If someone is obese, losing weight may help and if someone is driniking too much caffeine or alcohol reducing consumption can make a difference. If you think your sweating is due to an untreated medical condition then it is imperative that you speak with your doctor. Receiving proper treatment may solve several of your health issues.[2]

      Dealing with excessive crotch sweat is frustrating and sometimes people feel like there isn’t much they can do. These tips and tricks may help. Try them out so that you can get on with your life not worry about sweating down there.

      Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
      2. Sweaty Vagina: Why It Happens and What You Can Do. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/sweaty-vagina#wicking-underwear
      3. Zirwas, M. J., & Moennich, J. (2008). Antiperspirant and Deodorant Allergy Diagnosis and Management. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 1(3), 38-43. Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013594/
      4. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs#overview
      5. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
      6. Carpe Takes Aim At Groin Sweat, Launches Groin Powder With Precision Lever Sprayer. (2019, May 22). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from http://classifieds.usatoday.com/press/carpe-takes-aim-at-groin-sweat-launches-groin-powder-with-precision-lever-sprayer/
      Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

      How Can Men Stop Excessive Groin Sweating?

      By JP Carter /

      No one wants a sweaty crotch! 

      Excessive groin sweat can be an uncomfortable problem for men - sweaty balls are no joke.

      Luckily, there are many effective treatment options available! The type of treatment a person needs depends on the cause of their sweating.

      Is it: 

      • Clothing choice? 
      • Exercise regimen? 
      • Hereditary? 
      • A medical condition? 

      TREATMENT OPTIONS!

      Lifestyle Adjustments

      Change your underwear! 

      And we're not talking about putting on a new pair every day (but you should do that too)!

      Boxers that are made out of breathable cotton are best instead of briefs or boxer briefs. 

      Wash yourself! 

      Maintain proper hygiene. This means washing the groin with warm water and soap at least once a day, or twice if sweat has had time to accumulate.

      Otherwise, men can develop problems in addition to sweat like: 

      • chafing
      • itching
      • bacterial infections
      • fungal infections.

      This is how many athletes get jock itch.[4]

      Finally, losing extra weight, eating healthy, and limiting your consumption of beverages like coffee and alcohol can also reduce groin sweat .[4]

      Over-the-Counter Treatments

      There are many over-the-counter treatments can stop or help lessen excessive sweating in men.

      Options: 

      Antiperspirants

      It can be tricky to find the right type of antiperspirant for the groin, especially because it can cause irritation. However, there are solutions and antiperspirants can be quite helpful.[4]

      Powders

      Baby powder (talcum) powder or cornstarch powder can be applied to the groin to help with sweating.

      These powders absorb moisture, prevent chafing, and ease irritation.

      Talcum powder has been linked to ovarian cancer, but this is not an issue for men. Combining over-the-counter methods may lead to the largest benefit.[4]

      Medical Treatments (AKA When all else fails)

      If more conservative measures don’t stop excessive sweating in men, then they can pursue medical treatment options.

      Oral Medications

      Oral medications can be prescribed to reduce sweat production, but they often have undesirable systemic side effects.

      Doctors usually prescribe a class of medications called anticholinergics that prevent the body from producing sweat. They occasionally prescribe antidepressants or anxiolytics if they believe there is a psychiatric component to sweating.[2]

      Botox

      One of the most promising treatments used to decrease the production of groin sweat is the use of botox injections.

      Botox is injected into the skin of the problem areas and it prevents sweat production.

      To be clear, botox is not injected directly into sweaty balls, so don’t worry about that.

      Results can last for more than three months in most cases. Botox has very few side effects and is quite effective for this type of hyperhidrosis.[2]

      Surgery

      Finally, there are surgical treatments available to treat hyperhidrosis, but they usually are not a good option for issues with groin sweat.

      Usually excision of sweat glands is used, but this can be risky for the sensitive tissue in the groin region.[2]

      WHAT IS CAUSING GROIN SWEAT? 

      Is it medical? 

      Sometimes it's caused by a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis.[1], which often shows up when guys hit puberty and lasts for the rest of your life. Awesome, huh? When it's just in the groin, it's called Hexsel’s hyperhidrosis.[1] . 

      This can affect specific areas of the body:

      • Hands
      • Feet
      • Face
      • Armpits
      • Groin

      Sometimes, excessive groin sweating is caused by a condition called secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis tends to come on suddenly and it is caused by an underlying medical issue or as a side effect of a medication.  

      Here are some conditions that can cause groin sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis:

      • Diabetes
      • Hormone imbalances
      • Low blood sugar
      • Hyperthyroidism
      • Medication
      • Withdrawal
      • Several types of infections and other medical conditions[3]

      If you are a man struggling with groin sweat, it is worth your time to investigate the treatment options available. It can greatly improve your quality of life and reduce the symptoms you have to live with on a daily basis.

       

      Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
      2. Hexsel, D. M., Dal'Forno, T. D., & Hexsel, C. L. (2004). Inguinal, or Hexsel’s Hyperhidrosis. Clinics in Dermatology, 22, 53-59. Retrieved June 27, 2019, from https://www.sweathelp.org/pdf/Hexsel.pdf
      3. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? (n.d.). Retrieved July 1, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs
      4. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved July 1, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
      Complications of Hyperhidrosis

      Things to Avoid when Treating Hyperhidrosis

      By Katie Crissman /

      Hyperhidrosis affects upwards of 3% of the population, making it a very common medical condition. This means that there are many people seeking treatment for their excessive sweating. While there are several effective treatments for people with hyperhidrosis, there are some pitfalls that people need to be aware of. All of the medically recommended treatments for hyperhidrosis have been tested by the medical community but it doesn’t mean that they don’t come with their own risks. For those that suffer from primary focal hyperhidrosis proper treatment can make an immense difference in their quality of life.[1] Here is what people with hyperhidrosis need to watch out for as they figure out which treatments work best for them:

      Skin Irritation

      The first line treatment that dermatologists will recommend for hyperhidrosis is the use of antiperspirant. Antiperspirant is a type of topical treatment for hyperhidrosis that prevents skin from producing sweat.[1] It is considered to be a drug by the FDA due to the fact that it changes the function of skin. Most antiperspirants, even powerful ones, can be found over-the-counter and are quite effective at stopping a person from producing excessive sweat.[2] Typically, antiperspirant is used for axillary sweating although it has been used on other parts of the body more frequently as time goes on. One of the most bothersome side effects of antiperspirant is the irritation it can cause. When used on the less sensitive skin of the armpit this is not as big of an issue, but it is a problem when antiperspirant needs to be used on other, more sensitive, areas of the body.[1]

      The reason that antiperspirant can be so irritating is because of its active ingredient. Most antiperspirants use aluminum chloride, aluminum chloride hexahydrate, or a newer generation ingredient, like aluminum zirconium trichlorohydrex. These products can easily irritate skin. One study published in the journal of Dermatologic Clinics found that 26% of patients being treated with aluminum chloride antiperspirant reported stinging and itching sensations after use. If you are struggling to use antiperspirant because of skin irritation there are things you can do. Using antiperspirant consistently over a period of time seems to reduce skin irritation. You can also apply 1% hydrocortisone cream the morning after applying antiperspirant to clear up irritation. If you are sensitive to irritation then you may benefit from trying a newer generation antiperspirant with aluminum zirconium hexahydrate as the active ingredient. Studies have found that these antiperspirants tend to cause less irritation. There are also specific antiperspirants that are made for sensitive skin that you can try. Ultimately, you shouldn’t have to put up with skin irritation to talk to your doctor and see if you can find the antiperspirant that works best for your skin.[1]

      Stains

      Antiperspirants can be extremely helpful for those with excessive sweating, but they come with another major downfall - they stain clothing. Unfortunately, antiperspirant can leave a yellowish stain on clothing, especially when it is mixed with sweat. One study showed that up to 70% of people with axillary hyperhidrosis reported having to change their clothes at least two times a day. If a person is regularly sweating through their clothes it is safe to assume that they are also getting antiperspirant residue on their clothing. Antiperspirant is usually worth the inconvenience, and thankfully, there are effective ways to get antiperspirant out of clothes.[1]

      Medication Side Effects

      Doctors often treat hyperhidrosis with oral medications when other, more conservative, therapies have failed to work. Most of the time patients are prescribed a type of medication that falls into the class of anticholinergics. Anticholinergics work on the part of the nervous system that innervates sweat glands and stops the body from producing as much sweat. Unfortunately, they can also act on other parts of the body as well and cause unintended and unwanted side effects. The side effects a person will experience depend on their individual biological makeup and the specific medication they use. Some of the side effects of anticholinergics include dry mouth, constipation, nausea, vomiting, and many other possibilities. If you are planning to try oral medications for your hyperhidrosis, make sure that you work closely with your doctor to make sure that you aren’t suffering from intolerable side effects so that you can find the best medication for your body.[1]

      Not Trying Less Invasive Therapies First

      Almost all doctors that treat hyperhidrosis will recommend that patients begin trialing the most conservative treatments first before they move on to more invasive options. Sometimes, however, patients are exasperated with their condition and want to move on to more extensive options before trying all of the more conservative treatments. This is a big mistake because some of the most effective options are local therapies which are less invasive.[1] For example, a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis who didn’t respond well to an antiperspirant may try iontophoresis, but be inconsistent with their routine and fail to see a benefit. They may want to move on to botox injections, or even surgery, when iontophoresis may have worked if they had given it a proper chance. This would require them to take less risk and cost them less money. However, this isn’t the case for everyone and sometimes patients decide to go with more invasive treatments first for a variety of legitimate reasons. The most important thing is that you communicate openly with your doctor to find the treatment that is most effective for you.

      Giving Up

      Sometimes, despite their best efforts, patients can’t find an effective treatment for their hyperhidrosis. This can be extremely frustrating and disheartening because hyperhidrosis is a condition that negatively impacts quality of life.[1] However, it is important that patients continue to try new treatments as they come out and that they remain open to using the treatment options they do have. Even if your hyperhidrosis symptoms are not completely under control, most people find at least some relief from treatment. There are new treatments coming out every year and as awareness grows the future continues to look brighter for those with hyperhidrosis.

      Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
      2. Zirwas, M. J., & Moennich, J. (2008). Antiperspirant and Deodorant Allergy Diagnosis and Management. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 1(3), 38-43. Retrieved August 22, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013594/
      Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

      How Do I Apply Powder to my Groin?

      By Chris Reid /

      SHAKE IT, SHAKE IT, SHAKE IT

      How to Apply Powder to the Groin

      Seems like a no brainer, point and shake right?

      However, it is a little different depending on whether you are a man or woman:

      For Men:

      1. Clean the area. (Powders work best if used right after the skin is cleaned.)
      2. Dry completely. 
      3. Shake into hands, a cloth, or directly onto crotch 
      4. Use less than you think you need
      5. Fully cover area (front, back, under, in between)
      6. Actually rub it it until the powder is evenly spread around the problem area.
      7. Check it, It should not come off on hands. 
      8. Get dressed and enjoy your day, dry and confident[5]

      For Women:

      1. Clean the area. (Powders work best if used right after the skin is cleaned.)
      2. Dry completely. 
      3. Shake into hands, a cloth, or directly onto crotch 
      4. Use less than you think you need
      5. Actually rub it it until the powder is evenly spread around the problem area.
      6. Check to make sure the powder is spread out well and will not come off on your hand. I
      7. NOTE: It is important to make sure that you do not put any powder in your vagina, instead dust it around your vulva.
      8. NO TALC. It is also important that women avoid using powders made of talc so they do not expose themselves to unnecessary risk.[6]

       

      Do you need a groin powder? 

      Excessive sweating and constant moisture can wreak havoc on the skin that covers the groin.

      It can cause issues like:
      • maceration
      • jock itch
      • body odor
      • warts
      • bacterial infections
      • among others.[2]

      This makes it crucial for people who experience consistent moisture around their groin to find ways to keep it dry. So yes, you likely need it! 

      While powders will not prevent sweat production, they can protect the skin from moisture damage in a few different ways.

      When powder is applied to the groin it is able to:

    1. Absorb moisture and promote a dryer environment
    2. Cool and soothe the skin around the groin
    3. Prevent and lessen itching
    4. Prevent chafing and skin break down[3]

    5. Types of Groin Powder:

      • Talcum powder or Talc
      • Cornstarch powders
      • Baking soda
      • Oat flour,
      • Commercially made powders.[3]

      There are various types of products available on the market made especially for use on the groin, like Carpe’s No Sweat Groin Powder, that use different types of powders for safe and effective use.[4]

      NOTE:  Some studies have linked the use of talcum powder to a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer in women. This is because some natural forms of talc have been found to contain asbestos, which is a cancer causing agent.

      WHAT CAUSES IT?

      Aside from exercise, temperature, or clothing, excessive groin sweating can be caused by several factors, but for those who suffer from chronic excessive groin sweating it is often caused by either primary focal hyperhidrosis or secondary generalized hyperhidrosis.

      Unfortunately for those with hyperhidrosis, groin sweating can become so intense that people may frequently soak through underwear, experience embarrassment, and have to deal with health complications that arise when skin is exposed to constant moisture.[1]

      However, there are ways to decrease groin sweat and manage it effectively.

      What to Do if Powder Isn’t Enough

      If you are regularly using powder on your groin and not finding enough relief, consider looking into other ways to prevent groin sweat production.

      Other solutions: 

      • Over-the-counter antiperspirants
      • Oral prescription medications
      • Botox injections

      NOTE: Botox injections have been found to be one of the most highly effective treatments for groin sweating related to hyperhidrosis.[6]

      Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
      2. Common Complications of Hyperhidrosis. (n.d.). Retrieved August 8, 2019, from https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/common-complications-of-hyperhidrosis
      3. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved August 8, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
      4. Carpe Takes Aim At Groin Sweat, Launches Groin Powder With Precision Lever Sprayer. (2019, May 22). Retrieved August 8, 2019, from http://classifieds.usatoday.com/press/carpe-takes-aim-at-groin-sweat-launches-groin-powder-with-precision-lever-sprayer/
      5. How to Apply Talcum Powder. (n.d.). Retrieved August 8, 2019, from https://manscipated.com/how-to-use-talcum-powder-for-men/
      6. Butler, K. (2019, June 5). Why You Get So Sweaty Around Your Vagina—and How to Deal With It. Retrieved August 8, 2019, from https://www.prevention.com/health/a21097060/sweaty-vagina/
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