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Antiperspirant

7 Effective Tips to Stop Sweaty Hands

By Daniel McCarthy /

7 Effective Tips to Stop Sweaty Hands 

Not sure how to stop sweaty hands and excessive sweating? You aren’t alone! Whether you’re working from home, gaming, or just trying to get your phone to recognize your thumbprint, it can get pretty dang annoying to constantly worry about how to stop having sweaty hands. In this article, we’ll cover 7 effective ways to help you stop sweaty hands:

    1. Reduce your stress
    2. Try (the right) antiperspirant
    3. Iontophoresis
    4. Check with your doctor about underlying conditions
    5. Medications
    6. Give a Botox shot 
    7. Take a more surgical approach

1.  Reduce your stress 

This one is often easier said than done - but it can help a lot. Research has shown that higher levels of anxiety cause sweat glands to become more active [1]. This is particularly true for hand sweating. 

Figuring out how to stop sweaty hands looks different for each person, but there are some relaxing activities that can either prevent sweat or help control it once it’s begun. Some possible activities to reduce your stress include listening to your favorite music, getting enough sleep, and exercising daily. Other helpful techniques include deep breathing and stretching. Everyone is different, so try some of these other tips to find what works best for you. 

2. Try (the right) antiperspirant

You’re relaxed, but maybe you’re still trying to work out how to stop having sweaty hands? While reducing stress is a beneficial home remedy, it should be combined with other easy-to-use remedies. Some home remedies, such as baking soda or apple cider vinegar, may help with hyperhidrosis, but the next best step is over-the-counter antiperspirant

Antiperspirants are great at preventing clam hands and often work better than deodorants to stop excessive sweating. Antiperspirants for hands are especially important in how to stop sweaty hands. Others prefer anti sweat wipes. Finding the right hand antiperspirant is an important step to combat sweaty hands. 

3. Iontophoresis

    Hate needles? Need to figure out how to stop sweaty hands? Iontophoresis may be for you. This method uses mild electrical currents to treat your hands while they’re submerged in water. And although iontophoresis sessions may be performed at a doctor’s office, some people choose to purchase their own iontophoresis machines for at-home treatment [2].  

    While this method can be a bit harder on the wallet, if you can pay upfront for a machine, you may save by avoiding paying for every visit to the doctors. However, if you don’t see progress after a few weeks, talk to your doctor to discuss how to stop your sweaty hands from affecting your daily life. 

    4. Check with your doctor about underlying conditions

    It can be easy to write off sweaty hands as a reaction to anxiety or nervousness. But sometimes sweaty hands can be caused by underlying conditions. These conditions might include diabetes, low blood sugar, overactive thyroid, infections, and other issues. To learn more on how to stop sweaty hands that may be connected to underlying conditions, it is best to talk to a medical professional about your hyperhidrosis needs. 

    5. Medications

    In addition to talking about your underlying conditions, a medical professional may also suggest a prescription to help with sweaty hands. More specifically, your dermatologist may prescribe an oral medication for hyperhidrosis like a series of pills known as anticholinergics, which help your body produce less sweat. Like pills, topical creams may also be prescribed to help reduce excessive sweating. These creams are made up of solutions that will decrease the amount of sweat released, including hand sweat. If medications don’t cut it for you, you may need to take one of the two steps below. 

    6. Give botox a shot

      You may be thinking, I’m not sure how to stop sweaty hands, so why are you recommending botox? While many may not associate botox with hyperhidrosis, it can significantly reduce excessive sweating, including in your hands [3] . While botox may solve how to stop having sweaty hands, this method can cause temporary pain or weakness of the hands, so it is crucial that you consult a medical professional for appropriate botox delivery. 

      7. Take a more surgical approach. This one is only for serious sweaters who have tried everything else.

      If you can’t figure out how to stop having sweaty hands after trying these first six tips, you might consider surgical treatment for primary focal hyperhidrosis. While botox is a less invasive surgery, significantly more invasive procedures include endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy​ or an endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy. These names may be hard to pronounce, but these surgeries can provide significant relief for people with certain kinds of severe hyperhidrosis. Of course, try less invasive options first, and talk to a medical professional before deciding to take a more surgical approach. 

      There may be no one-size-fits-all solution for how to stop sweaty hands, but hopefully one of, or a combo of these tips help you enjoy life a bit more and worry about sweat a bit less. 

      Sources

      1. Huddle, J. R. (2014). Hyperhidrosis: Causes, Treatment Options and Outcomes. New York, NY: Nova Science.
      2. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from <a href=https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0>https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0</a>
      3. Lakraj, A. A., Moghimi, N., & Jabbari, B. (2013). Hyperhidrosis: anatomy, pathophysiology and treatment with emphasis on the role of botulinum toxins. Toxins, 5(4), 821–840. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins5040821
      Factors that Make Hyperhidrosis Worse

      5 Foolproof Ways to Survive Football Season When You Sweat a Lot

      By JP Carter /

      Football season is finally rolling around as the weather cools off, but some players struggle with sweat problems as the season heats up. Athletes are known to sweat copiously when they are performing - it is a sign of health as it is the body’s only physiological adaptation to keep itself cool. In fact, those who are more fit tend to sweat more than those who are not because they can workout at a greater workload which generates more heat. However, at a certain point sweating can become an issue for athletes trying to perform at an optimal level.[1] This is true for athletes in all types of sports, but it can be especially pertinent to football players as they participate in such a high impact sport and come in such varied shapes and sizes. One study found that linebackers tend to sweat more, on average, than other types of players due to the size of their bodies. Their overall larger size caused them to generate more heat while working out and thus produce more sweat[2] While a linebacker producing more sweat than a smaller player is normal and makes sense, some players make such large quantities of sweat that it interferes with their performance.

      So, how much sweat is too much? There is a large natural variation in the amount of sweat physiologically normal people produce. One person can produce twice as much sweat as another and still be within the normal range. However, some people sweat so much that it indicates that they may have a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is a condition that causes people to sweat in excess of what the body needs to maintain its internal temperature. People with the condition may sweat four to five times as much as a normal person. Hyperhidrosis usually causes excessive sweating to happen on specific parts of the body like the hands, feet, armpits, face, and occasionally the back and groin. It is not a dangerous condition, but it can have damaging consequences for football players who have it. It affects around 3% of the population so it is not uncommon. If you have the following symptoms you may be struggling with hyperhidrosis:

    1. You sweat excessively even in cool conditions when you aren’t working out
    2. You sweat from specific areas of your body like the hands, feet, armpits, or face
    3. The amount of sweat you produce causes you to have functional issues when you are trying to play football[3]
    4. If sweat is interfering with your ability to play football then check out these tips to get your sweating under control and your focus back in the game.

      #1 Wear the Right Gear

      As many athletes know, it is imperative to wear the right type of clothing when performing. This is also the case when it comes to protecting yourself from sweat. If you have hyperhidrosis, or even if you just sweat a lot, wearing the right clothing during a workout session can protect you from chafing, skin breakdown, and irritation.[4] The most important clothes for people who sweat excessively are underwear and socks.This is because they are the clothes that will come in contact with your sweat the most. The best type of underwear tend to be manufactured by athletic brands. It is best to go with underwear that is made from new types of fabrics that have moisture wicking technology. This advice holds up for athletic socks as well. These materials will keep sweat away from your skin and keep it dryer for longer.

      When buying clothes to workout in try and find shirts and pants made out of natural, lightweight fibers - like cotton. These types of fabrics are breathable and absorbent allow sweat to transfer away from the skin. You may not have as much choice of what to wear when you are in an actual game, but keeping your skin safe during practices can ensure that you are ready to perform on days when you have less control over your wardrobe.

      You may also want to try:

    5. Wearing a headband if you struggle with sweat dripping and burning your face.
    6. Use gloves to prevent slippage when throwing and catching the ball.
    7. Wear extra padding under your uniform if you are worried about sweat leaking through to the outside.
    8. #2 Use Antiperspirant and Powder to Improve Grip

      Antiperspirant is a must have for anyone with excessive sweating, especially athletes. Antiperspirant allows skin to produce less sweat by forming a superficial plug within sweat glands.You can use antiperspirant on specific problem areas of your body which makes it even more ideal for athletes. For example, if you are struggling with your grip on the ball you can apply antiperspirant to your hands so you won’t sweat as much from them. This way it won’t affect the rest of your body. Antiperspirant is the first line treatment doctors recommend for hyperhidrosis because it works locally and it is considered to be very effective.[5] Powders, like baby powder, can also be useful to keep your hands and feet from slipping when you have extra sweat. They can be applied before practice or a game and have virtually no side effects. You can find over-the-counter topical treatments for hyperhidrosis, like antiperspirants and powders, at your local pharmacy or grocery store. There are several types and brands to choose from. Some brands, like Carpe, have antiperspirant lotion that is useful for sensitive skin. The same brand make a groin powder to help cut down on chafing and discomfort. Other brands offer antiperspirants that come in spray, roll on, and stick forms. It is important to read labels and stay informed so you can choose the right antiperspirant for you.

      #3 Protect Yourself from Jock Itch

      ock itch, as the name implies, is a common ailment for male athletes. It is a type of fungal infection that is medically referred to as tinea cruris. It is caused by a type of fungus called ringworm and it thrives on warm moist areas of the body. It can be a common problem for people who deal with excessive sweating on a regular basis, especially athletes. You may have ringworm if you are experiencing the following around the area of the groin:

    9. Itching and burning
    10. Red, scaly rash with raised edges
    11. Cracking, flaking, or peeling skin[6]
    12. If you suspect that you have jock itch then you need to treat it. Most cases can be resolved fairly easily with an over-the-counter antifungal. It is easy to prevent jock itch by doing the following:

    13. Showering frequently, especially after sweating
    14. Don’t share your personal items like towels with others
    15. Wear clean clothes and change after a workout
    16. Wear loose fitting clothes and switch to boxers if you have an ongoing problem[6]
    17. #4 Check Your Anxiety Levels for Better Performance

      Hyperhidrosis and anxiety are closely related as anxiety can be a result of the condition and it can also make it worse. This can be especially pertinent for football players as performance anxiety prior to games can make sweating worse which can, in turn, affect performance. If you are dealing with anxiety try to find ways to relax so that you focus on your game and not on your sweat. There are some relaxation techniques like meditation, biofeedback, hypnosis, and yoga that have been shown to reduce stress, and in some cases, reduce sweating.[7] Working on your anxiety will help you focus better on football, improve your skills, and reduce your sweating. If anxiety is a big problem for you then talking to a doctor can help.

      #5 Stay Clean

      This may seem obvious, but it is imperative that athletes who have been sweating profusely shower after every workout. This won’t reduce the amount you sweat, but it will improve other associated problems. It is a good idea to shower and use antibacterial soap, especially after touching equipment used by many other people. This is prevent bacteria on the surface of your skin from breaking down sweat and producing foul smelling byproducts and it will reduce your chance of catching fungal and bacterial infections. When you sweat often it is important to prevent skin breakdown and staying clean is necessary for that. It is also a good idea to change into clean clothes after every workout. If you decide to apply antiperspirant it is best to do so later in the day after a shower when your skin is dry.[8]

      If these tips aren’t cutting it and you are still struggling with sweat, then it may be time to see a doctor. There are several effective treatments available for people with hyperhidrosis and they can improve your ability to play football as well as your quality of life if you need them. Don't give up and give it your best this season!

      Sources
      1. Heid, M. (2015, July 8). You Asked: Is It Healthy to Sweat A Lot? Time. Retrieved from https://time.com/3947804/sweating-healthy/
      2. Godek, S. F., Bartolozzi, A. R., Burkholder, R. B., Sugarman, E., & Peduzzi, C. (2008). Sweat Rates and Fluid Turnover in Professional Football Players: A Comparison of National Football League Linemen and Backs. Journal of Athletic Training, 184–189. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2267333/
      3. Doheny, K. (n.d.). How Much Sweating Is Too Much? Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/features/dont-sweat-it#1
      4. Doheny, K. (n.d.). When You Sweat Too Much. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/features/dont-sweat-it#1
      5. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
      6. What Causes Jock Itch? Can You Prevent It? (2019, May 15). Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/men/causes-and-prevent-jock-itch#1
      7. Shenefelt, P. D. (2017). Use of Hypnosis, Meditation, and Biofeedback in Dermatology. Clinics in Dermatology. doi:10.1016/J.clindermatol.2017.01.007
      8. Excessive Sweating: Treatment Tips. (2017, October 21). Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/hyperhidrosis-treatment-11#1
      Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

      How to Stop Groin Sweat: 10 Ways to Deal with Crotch Sweat

      By JP Carter /

      Unfortunately, some people have to deal with excessive crotch sweat on a daily basis. Many of the people who struggle with this issue suffer from a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis, a medical situation that causes excessive sweating to occur on specific parts of the body. However, just because you have a lot of groin sweat doesn’t necessarily imply that you have the condition.[1]

      Whether or not you have hyperhidrosis, crotch sweat can be embarrassing and hard to deal with. Below are 10 ways that you stop groin sweat so that you can stay comfortable and dry.

      Wear the Right Underwear

      What you wear matters when it comes to excessive crotch sweat - especially what you wear under your clothes. It’s important for people who struggle with groin sweat to choose the right type of undergarments. This means not wearing overly tight underwear made of non-breathable materials like polyester and other types of stifling synthetic fabrics. The best types of underwear for those with sweat issues are made of cotton or moisture wicking materials. Cotton is a breathable type of fabric that allows moisture to evaporate off of skin. Moisture wicking fabrics take this one step further and actually keep moisture away from the skin so that it stays dryer, longer. If you are struggling with extremely heavy sweating then you may want to invest in padded underwear which are made to absorb excess sweat and keep it from leaking out onto the outer layer of your clothing.[2]

      Use Antiperspirant

      Using antiperspirant is one of the most effective things you can do to stop crotch sweat production. Antiperspirant is a type of topical treatment for hyperhidrosis that changes the function of skin in such a way that it stops it from producing sweat. Due to the way it affects the body antiperspirant is considered to be a drug and is regulated by the FDA.[3] You can find a large variety of antiperspirants over-the-counter and they are meant to be applied topically. Antiperspirant works best when it is applied after a shower to dry skin before bed time, this allows it to sink into sweat glands and form a barrier that will be effective the next day. It can be hard to choose the right over-the-counter antiperspirant so talk to your doctor if you are not sure which product you should try.[1]

      Use Hygiene Hacks

      It is essential that people with crotch sweat use hygienic practices to their advantage. It is recommended that people who sweat excessively change take showers twice a day if possible. However, this can be time consuming and isn’t realistic for everyone. If you can’t shower frequently then it is a good idea to change your clothes any time sweating becomes excessive and wash your groin in between changes. Even though washing will not stop your sweating it will reduce odor build up, prevent skin breakdown, and make you more comfortable. It is a good idea to keep baby wipes and extra underwear with you for quick clean up sessions on the go. [2][4]

      Apply Powder

      Once you have cleaned your groin after a bout of intense sweating, it may be beneficial to apply powder. There are a few types of powder that can be useful when you have crotch sweat but they all serve to absorb moisture, reduce irritation, prevent chafing, and reduce itching. It’s important to avoid powders that contain talc as it has been associated with the development of ovarian cancer when used by women. However, there are powders with bases like cornstarch or baking soda, among others.[5] Some brands, like Carpe, make powders that are specifically formulated for use on the groin and are considered to be safe.[6]

      Groom to Your Advantage

      While grooming your pubic region will not completely hinder crotch sweat production it may lessen how much you produce and make it easier to keep clean. Retaining some pubic hair may be to your advantage as it has the ability to reduce friction between clothing and skin and wick moisture away from the skin’s surface. However, keeping hair short and trimmed is recommended because this makes it less likely for bacteria, which are responsible for body odor, to stay trapped on the surface of the skin. It also makes your groin easier to clean so that hygienic practices are more effective.[2]

      Wear Loose Fitting Clothing

      This one may seem obvious, but wearing loose fitting clothing can make you less likely to sweat and keep the sweat you do produce from lingering on your skin. Tight fitting pants will raise the temperature of your groin and make crotch sweat worse. They can also create more friction and make you more uncomfortable. This applies to underwear as well, men may want to opt for boxers instead of briefs and women should probably avoid skin tight panties.[2]

      Try Relaxation Techniques

      For some people, anxiety can make groin sweating worse.[2] It is also known that anxiety is related to hyperhidrosis and relaxation techniques have had some success in helping people to control their symptoms[1]. You may want to try biofeedback, mediation, yoga, or another type of relaxation activity to relax your mind and body. Relaxation by itself will not cure hyperhidrosis, but it can improve the symptoms and help you deal with the repercussions of having a stressful condition.

      Get Botox Injections

      When more conservative approaches have failed, it may be time to seek out medical intervention. Botox injections are known to stop the production of sweat and have successfully been used to treat crotch sweat. They are used to treat excessive sweating on other parts of the body like the armpits, hands, and feet. The effects of botox injections last between three and six months and they have been highly effective for some who use them. If you are interested in trying botox then make an appointment with a knowledgeable dermatologist.[1]

      Try Oral Medications

      Some doctors will prescribe medications to stop the body from producing as much sweat. Usually these medications come from a class of medications called anticholinergics. They can be helpful for some people but have the potential to cause undesirable side effects like dry mouth, constipation, nausea, drowsiness, and many others. This is because oral medications affect the whole body rather than just target the specific problem area. In some cases doctors may use antidepressants, beta blockers, or benzodiazepines to reduce anxiety and therefore improve the symptoms of hyperhidrosis.[1]

      Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle

      Sometimes excessive sweating can be worsened by a person’s lifestyle. This can be due to the fact that a person is obese, has a poorly treated underlying medical condition, or if they consume too much alcohol or caffeine. The symptoms of hyperhidrosis, or sweating in general, can be improved by taking steps to remedy these issues. If someone is obese, losing weight may help and if someone is driniking too much caffeine or alcohol reducing consumption can make a difference. If you think your sweating is due to an untreated medical condition then it is imperative that you speak with your doctor. Receiving proper treatment may solve several of your health issues.[2]

      Dealing with excessive crotch sweat is frustrating and sometimes people feel like there isn’t much they can do. These tips and tricks may help. Try them out so that you can get on with your life not worry about sweating down there.

      Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
      2. Sweaty Vagina: Why It Happens and What You Can Do. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/sweaty-vagina#wicking-underwear
      3. Zirwas, M. J., & Moennich, J. (2008). Antiperspirant and Deodorant Allergy Diagnosis and Management. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 1(3), 38-43. Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013594/
      4. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs#overview
      5. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
      6. Carpe Takes Aim At Groin Sweat, Launches Groin Powder With Precision Lever Sprayer. (2019, May 22). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from http://classifieds.usatoday.com/press/carpe-takes-aim-at-groin-sweat-launches-groin-powder-with-precision-lever-sprayer/
      Causes of Hyperhidrosis

      Everything You Need to Know About What Hyperhidrosis Is

      By Chris Reid /

      What Is Hyperhidrosis?

      Hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating, is characterized by sweat that is produced in excess of what is necessary for thermoregulation (the ability to maintain a healthy temperature). Sweating is a perfectly natural and necessary function the body uses to cool itself down. However, if you have hyperhidrosis, you’ll start sweating even when your body isn’t overheating.[1] Sweating that has no apparent cause is known to doctors as diaphoresis.[2]

      If you have hyperhidrosis, you can experience sweating on several parts of the body, including in the hands, underarms, face, scalp, and feet. Some people even experience excessive groin sweat and sweating under the breasts. The type of hyperhidrosis you have will determine whether you experience sweating all over your body or if it is just in specific areas. Some people with hyperhidrosis sweat in several different areas simultaneously, while others only experience excessive sweating at one location - it is a highly individualized condition. Hands, feet, and underarms are the parts of the body that are most likely to be affected by hyperhidrosis.[3]

      People who suffer from hyperhidrosis have the same number and size of sweat glands as people who don’t have the condition. Their sweat glands are just overactive, compared to what they would normally be.[1]

      What Are the Symptoms of Hyperhidrosis?

      If you’re wondering how to tell whether you have hyperhidrosis , here is a checklist of symptoms for you to review.

      • Noticeable sweat:Even when you’re sitting down and taking it easy, you’ll notice your clothes are wet. On your bare skin, you’ll often see beads of sweat.
      • You leave a trail in your wake:You might not just see sweat on your clothes and skin. You might be transferring it to everything you touch, including door knobs, keyboards, and papers that you touch.
      • Your skin is white and peeling:You might notice white and peeling skin from the constant moisture.
      • You have skin infections:Skin infections can happen to people who don’t have hyperhidrosis. However, if you have repeated skin infections due to constant moisture, like athlete’s foot, you might suspect hyperhidrosis.[1]

      Different dermatologists characterize hyperhidrosis in various ways. What’s important is the fact that if you are uncomfortable with the level of sweat that your body produces (wherever it’s being produced), there are solutions that are available. You have access to over-the-counter topical treatments, prescription options, and medical procedures that can help. If you are interested in medical solutions, you can book an appointment with your dermatologist and learn how to manage hyperhidrosis with a dermatologist.[3]

      Now that we’ve answered the question “what is hyperhidrosis?”, It’s important to understand the different types of hyperhidrosis. The approaches used to understand and treat hyperhidrosis are very different depending on the type you have.

      The Two Main Types of Hyperhidrosis

      There are two main types of hyperhidrosis. There are a few other types that are much less common, but the vast majority of people will either have primary focal hyperhidrosis or secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Let’s look at each type of hyperhidrosis and what they entail.

      Primary Focal Hyperhidrosis

      Primary Focal Hyperhidrosis (PFH) is by far the most common type, affecting up to 90 percent of people who have hyperhidrosis. The cause is not well understood, but it is thought to have a genetic component.[3]

      People with primary focal hyperhidrosis only sweat in particular areas like the hands, feet, armpits, face, and groin. Sweat will occur on both sides of the body in the same place. For example, if someone has one sweaty hand it is likely their other hand will also be sweaty. Additionally, the sweat will usually occur in more than one area — one common problem with PFH is that the sweating occurs on hands and feet simultaneously. It can also affect other body parts individually or simultaneously, it just depends on a person’s specific situation.[3]

      Symptoms usually begin in childhood or adolescence and tend to last for a person’s entire lifetime. There is evidence that primary focal hyperhidrosis is hereditary, meaning it has a genetic component and often runs in families.[3]

      Secondary Generalized Hyperhidrosis

      While primary focal hyperhidrosis appears to be something you’re born with,secondary generalized hyperhidrosis (SGH) is a condition that shows up during adulthood. Think of SGH as an uninvited guest who arrives on your doorstep with no warning. Unfortunately, it may be a little harder to get rid of than an uninvited guest.[3]

      You might suddenly wonder why you’ve been so sweaty lately. And you’d be right to wonder, because this type of hyperhidrosis can point to an underlying problem.

      When someone has secondary hyperhidrosis the biggest problem isn’t the hyperhidrosis – it’s the disease or condition that might be causing it. That’s why it’s known as secondary hyperhidrosis. The true cause may be a medical condition and the symptom of that condition is hyperhidrosis.[3]

      Before you panic that you’re suffering from a mysterious disease, keep in mind the source of this type of hyperhidrosis can also be a medication. Many common medications can cause hyperhidrosis as a side effect.[3]

      Unlike primary focal hyperhidrosis, the sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis tends to occur all over the body. This is a telltale sign of the condition.[3]

      Unlike primary hyperhidrosis, this condition doesn’t have to be permanent. If the instigating condition is found and treated, it can fix the hyperhidrosis. It may take a little work, but you CAN kick this guest off your porch.[3]

      If you are concerned that your hyperhidrosis might have an underlying cause, schedule an appointment to talk to your doctor and find out.[3]

      The Impact of Hyperhidrosis

      While hyperhidrosis isn’t particularly dangerous physically, it can be embarrassing for those who suffer from it. It won’t just give you clammy skin – the sweat can literally drip off. That can cause a great deal of anxiety for those who experience it.[3]

      Shaking hands can become a nightmare because you may be so self-conscious about how sweaty your palms are. Your socks can become wet even if you don’t do any exercise. It can make basic human experiences extremely stressful.

      Unfortunately, hyperhidrosis is more serious than just uncomfortable sweating. Up to a third of people who deal with excessive sweating from hyperhidrosis say that they are constantly bothered by their sweating. One study done in the US found that 75% of respondents reported that hyperhidrosis negatively impacted their social, emotional, and mental health.[4] That’s a lot of people who are suffering! Due to these issues, hyperhidrosis and anxiety often go hand in hand.[3] Many people find it helpful to utilize anxiety reduction methods that are known to lessen excessive sweating.

      Hyperhidrosis is hard for adults to deal with, so it is especially important to find help for kids with hyperhidrosis.

      Some people refer to hyperhidrosis as a silent handicap because of the impact it has upon the lives of those who live with it. It can deeply impact their confidence and hyperhidrosis can even keep people from doing the things they love most.[5]

      Is Hyperhidrosis Common?

      It is thought that about 3% of the US population struggles with hyperhidrosis. In other countries the percentage of the population that has it is even higher.[3] Other sources have stated that up to 5% of the population might even have it![6] This means that hyperhidrosis is a very common issue.

      While most doctor’s offices are familiar with managing hyperhidrosis, they generally don’t see a lot of patients who suffer from it. However, because hyperhidrosis is such an embarrassing and overlooked condition, many individuals avoid reporting the issue to their doctor. This means that the number of people who have hyperhidrosis might even be higher than we currently think.[3]

      Those with family members who have this ailment are more likely to get it – making it an inherited condition. If you have a family member teased for their sweaty hands constantly, there could be a chance they have hyperhidrosis. [3]

      What Causes Hyperhidrosis?

      Doctors don’t truly understand what causes primary focal hyperhidrosis yet. One theory is that particular nerves that control the amount of sweat overreact or malfunction. That malfunction can cause the excessive sweating that can be life-changing for those who suffer from it.[7]

      Since hyperhidrosis affects so many people, researchers are now shifting into full gear to discover the causes of excessive sweating so they can develop better treatments. Future treatments and research for hyperhidrosis are being developed more rapidly than ever before.[3]

      What Conditions Can Cause Secondary Generalized Hyperhidrosis?

      Many diseases and medical conditions can cause hyperhidrosis. However, just because you have one of the conditions listed below this paragraph doesn’t mean you’ll develop hyperhidrosis.

      Here are some of the more common conditions that may be causing the hyperhidrosis you have developed as an adult.

      • A febrile illness
      • Menopause
      • Hyperthyroidism
      • Heart failure
      • Diabetes
      • Frostbite
      • Alcoholism - Alcohol can cause excessive sweating when someone is intoxicated, withdrawing, or in someone with an intolerance.
      • Gout
      • Lymphoma and some other cancers and tumors.
      • Obesity
      • Pregnancy
      • Parkinson’s disease
      • Rheumatoid arthritis
      • Stroke[3]

      There are also several types of common medications that cause hyperhidrosis as a side effect. So, if you are on medication and you begin experiencing new or increased amounts of sweating mention it to your doctor. Some of these medications include antidepressants, painkillers, blood pressure medications and many others.a [3]

      If you think you might have secondary generalized hyperhidrosis it is very important that you speak to a doctor. Many of the things that cause it can be resolved, and it could be a sign of a more serious problem. Don’t panic, but it is wise to look into the reason you are sweating more.

      What Are the Treatments for Primary Focal Hyperhidrosis?

      If you are diagnosed with primary focal hyperhidrosis, there are many things you can do.These are the existing treatments for hyperhidrosis, but new treatments are currently being explored by scientists:

      • Antiperspirants:There are many over-the-counter antiperspirants that can be very useful when trying to curb sweat. If a regular antiperspirant isn’t cutting it for you, ask your doctor to write a prescription for a stronger one. You can apply antiperspirant to places other than just your underarms. Use it on your hands, hairline, or feet as well. There are even antiperspirants for the face and groin that are made specifically for sensitive areas.
      • An Iontophoresis machine:This medical device sends low-voltage currents into a pan of water where your hands or feet are sitting. The electricity can lessen the activity of your sweat glands, at least for a while. However, it can take up to 10 sessions with the iontophoresis machine to deactivate your sweat glands. You may need to use this machine up to three times a week in the beginning and one treatment can take up to 40 minutes. Although iontophoresis as a treatment for palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis may give your hands and feet a much needed break, the iontophoresis machine is anything but convenient. Iontophoresis really does work, but patients have to be willing to keep up with a regular treatment regimen for it to work successfully.
      • Botox:If other treatments aren’t enough in your, you might need Botox injections. Botox can be particularly useful for axillary hyperhidrosis, but botox can also be a treatment for palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis. Botox can provide up to 6 months of reduced sweating. If you’re going to pursue this route, you should look for someone who is experienced at doing Botox injections in the underarms to ensure the right area is targeted.
      • Anticholinergics:A few oral medications can for hyperhidrosis can reduce the amount of sweat you produce by stopping your sweat glands from working. Most commonly patients are prescribed anticholinergics like glycopyrrolate or oxybutynin as a treatment for hyperhidrosis. These medications also have several side effects, including heart palpitations, blurry vision, and dry mouth.
      • ETS Surgery:An endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is a surgical treatment for primary focal hyperhidrosis. It is an operation where an individual actually has the nerve endings that transfer sensory information to the sweat glands destroyed. Since no known successful reversal of an ETS surgery has ever been recorded, this option isn’t usually on the table unless the other treatments have failed. As with any surgery, it can be risky. There is also a type of surgery called an endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy which is used to treat plantar hyperhidrosis, but this surgery can be very dangerous and is almost never recommended.[3]

      Defeating Hyperhidrosis

      Undoubtedly, hyperhidrosis can be a hard condition to cope with. Until recently, the lack of research into hyperhidrosis had made hyperhidrosis difficult to manage. Thankfully, however, new treatments and awareness has made hyperhidrosis much easier to handle. Keep trying treatments until you find what works for you and remember that you are not alone in suffering with this condition. It’s just a matter of figuring out what you can do to control your sweat instead of your sweat controlling you!

      Sources
      1. MedicineNet Medical Journal. (2016, May 13). Definition of Hyperhidrosis. Retrieved May 14, 2018, from https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=16272
      2. Diaphoresis: What causes excessive sweating? (n.d.). Retrieved May 20, 2020, from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321663#overview
      3. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
      4. Lenefsky, M., & Rice, Z. P. (2018). Hyperhidrosis and Its Impact on Those Living With It. AJMC. Retrieved from https://www.ajmc.com/journals/supplement/2018/hyperhidrosis-managed-markets-update-treatments/hyperhidrosis-and-its-impact--on-those-living-with-it
      5. Nordqvist, C. (2017, December 21). Hyperhidrosis: Symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment. Retrieved May 14, 2018, from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/182130.php

        Doolittle, James, et al. “Hyperhidrosis: an Update on Prevalence and Severity in the United States.” Archives of Dermatological Research, vol. 308, no. 10, 2016, pp. 743–749., doi:10.1007/s00403-016-1697-9. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27744497/

        Huddle, J. R. (2014). Hyperhidrosis: Causes, Treatment Options and Outcomes. New York, NY: Nova Science. Retrieved from https://www.bookdepository.com/Hyperhidrosis-Janine-R-Huddle/9781633215160

      Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

      How Can I Control Foot Sweat?

      By Chris Reid /

      Excessively sweaty feet can lead to some big problems. Some people just have mildly sweaty feet, but others find that sweaty feet greatly impact their quality of life. This is often the case for people who have primary focal hyperhidrosis, a condition in which people sweat excessively from specific parts of the body - including the feet. Many people with sweaty feet struggle with staining and destroying shoes, have difficulty wearing sandals and flip flops, have trouble walking barefoot, and constantly need to wear absorbent socks. Even worse, people whose feet are constantly exposed to moisture are at risk for foot conditions like Athlete’s foot, skin maceration, infections, and irritation. This is why it is imperative for people with excessively sweaty feet to find a way to kick their sweat and get control of the problem.[1]

      Natural Ways to Manage Sweaty Feet

      Sometimes excessive foot sweating can be managed with natural methods and lifestyle changes. There are some practical things you can do, which won’t reduce the amount you sweat, but will help you to manage things better and prevent some of the complications that come along with sweaty feet. Here are some things you can do to manage your sweaty situation:

    18. Wash your feet frequently. While washing your feet won’t stop you from sweating, it will reduce your risk of infection, keep skin from getting irritated, prevent odor build up, and prevent bacterial growth. Ideally, you should aim to wash your feet twice a day if you have been sweating in your shoes for an extended period of time. It is also beneficial to use certain products while you wash your feet. These can include antifungal products, certain essential oils, epsom salt to soothe feet, and of course, soap.
    19. Soak your feet is a black tea bath. It is suggested that you fill a basin with warm water and add two tea bags to soak your feet in. It is thought that the tannins in black tea affect your sweat glands in such a way that it stops them from producing as much sweat. This method isn’t scientifically tested, but it may be worth a try!
    20. Wear the right socks and shoes. Certain sock materials are good for sweaty feet, while others are not. For example, it is a good idea to avoid cotton socks, while materials like merino wool and athletic socks with moisture wicking technology are better for keeping sweat away from the skin. The material your shoes are made of are also important, leather or mesh athletic shoes are best as they allow your feet to breathe.
    21. Alternate your shoes and change socks often. It might be worth it to invest in two pairs of shoes that you can alternate every other day. This allows each pair to dry completely before you get them wet again, it will also prevent shoe damage and break down from being as severe. It is also a good idea to keep an extra pair of socks with you and to change your socks any time your feet become completely soaked. This will keep your feet and skin healthier.[2]
    22. Over-the-Counter Treatment Options

      One of the most helpful tools for people with sweaty feet are over-the-counter products. Over-the-counter topical treatments for hyperhidrosis called antiperspirants are the most essential. Antiperspirant is the first-line treatment doctors recommend for hyperhidrosis because they treat the problem at a local area and they effectively prevent sweat glands from producing sweat. Many people have success with over-the-counter antiperspirants, but antiperspirant is available by prescription if a higher strength is needed.[1] There is also a type of soothing treatment called foot powder. Foot powder is a powder that you apply to dry feet which absorbs excessive sweat and soothes irritated skin. When used in combination antiperspirant and foot powder can bring much relief. Finally, antifungal powder is suggested if you think you may have athlete’s foot.[2]

      Medical Treatments for Sweaty Feet

      For some people, especially those with hyperhidrosis, lifestyle adjustments and over-the-counter options might not be enough to control their foot sweat. Luckily, there are several effective medical treatment options available. Most doctors suggest that patients try over-the-counter and prescription antiperspirants before moving on to more intensive treatments. Once a patient has exhausted these options, however, doctors have many options that they can try in order to eliminate foot sweating and to improve patients quality of life. Here is a breakdown of the available treatments, from minimally invasive techniques to highly intense surgical procedures:

    23. Iontophoresis: Iontophoresis is a type of therapy that uses the passing of an ionized substance through intact skin by application of a direct electrical current to stop the body from producing as much sweat. While this sounds complicated, the procedure is quite simple and it doesn’t hurt the patient. Iontophoresis is used to treat palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis and is one of the least invasive hyperhidrosis treatments available. When used to treat sweaty feet, a patients is given two trays of water to place their feet in which are connected by electrical wires. A machine pulses small electrical currents through the water and through the skin of the patient’s feet which greatly reduces the amount of sweat they will produce. The procedure needs to be repeated a few times a week to maintain results. Iontophoresis has been found to be highly effective and many people use it as a part of their weekly routine.
    24. Botox Injections: Botox injections can reduce the skin’s ability to produce sweat and they have been approved as a treatment for axillary hyperhidrosis by the FDA. While botox is not specifically approved for the treatment of plantar hyperhidrosis, many people have had a significant reduction in symptoms when it is used. Typically, a doctor will assess the problem area, in this case that would be the feet, and then inject botox into the skin in a grid like pattern. The results from botox injections will usually last for several months making it a convenient treatment method.
    25. Oral Medications: There are oral medications that can reduce the amount of sweat people produce, however none of them are specifically approved by the FDA for the treatment of hyperhidrosis. Most of the time doctors recommend that patients receive local treatment whenever possible, but medication can be useful for certain patients. Anticholinergics are the most common type of medication that doctors prescribe for people with hyperhidrosis, these include medicines like glycopyrrolate and oxybutynin. Sometimes, other types of medications are used like beta blockers, anti anxiety medications, and clonidine.
    26. Surgery: A type of surgery to treat sweaty feet called endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy is available. However, it is almost never recommended because the side effects from the surgery can be catastrophic. If you are sweating to the point where you are considering this type of surgery it is best to try the other available treatments or combinations of those treatments rather than undergoing a risky procedure. While it is similar to endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy, the risks are much higher.[1]
    27. Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier
      2. Leonard, J. (n.d.). What causes feet sweating? Retrieved June 3, 2019, from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322578.php
      Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

      How Can Men Stop Excessive Groin Sweating?

      By JP Carter /

      Excessive groin sweating can be an especially uncomfortable problem for men - sweaty balls are no joke. Luckily, there are many effective treatment options available. The type of treatment a person needs depends on the cause of their sweating. Many times, excessive sweating in men, especially groin sweating, is caused by a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis.[1]

      Primary focal hyperhidrosis usually develops during puberty and can last for a lifetime. It usually affects specific areas of the body including the hands, feet, face, armpits, and sometimes, the groin. When primary hyperhidrosis affects the groin it is medically referred to as Hexsel’s hyperhidrosis.[1] Excessive groin sweating caused by primary focal hyperhidrosis affects both men and women equally.[2] However, excessive sweating in men causes different secondary issues when it affects the groin because their anatomy is different than women.

      Sometimes, excessive groin sweating is caused by a condition called secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis tends to come on suddenly and it is caused by an underlying medical issue or as a side effect of a medication. Secondary hyperhidrosis affects both men and women, but there are some issues that cause it to occur in women that men will not have to deal with. Treatment for secondary hyperhidrosis consists of treating the underlying condition that’s causing the excessive sweating.[1] Here are some conditions that can cause groin sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis:

      • Diabetes
      • Hormone imbalances
      • Low blood sugar
      • Hyperthyroidism
      • Medication
      • Withdrawal
      • Several types of infections and other medical conditions[3]

      Treatment Options for Men

      Sweaty balls are no fun - they’re downright uncomfortable! The good news is that there are several effective treatment options men can use to get their groin sweat under control. Below are several choices you can try out if you are struggling with sweat.

      Lifestyle Adjustments

      In some cases, lifestyle adjustments can make a big difference when trying to lessen excessive sweating in men. It often won’t completely solve the issue, but it can help.

      First of all, the type of underwear you use can make a big difference. It is best to opt for boxers that are made out of breathable cotton instead of briefs or boxer briefs. This is because sweaty balls need proper ventilation.

      Secondly, it is imperative to maintain proper hygiene. This means washing the groin with warm water and soap at least once a day, or twice if sweat has had time to accumulate. Otherwise, men can develop problems like chafing, itching, bacterial infections, and fungal infections. This is how many athletes get jock itch.[4]

      Finally, losing extra weight, eating healthy, and limiting your consumption of beverages like coffee and alcohol can also improve the amount of groin sweat men produce.[4]

      Over-the-Counter Treatments

      Many over-the-counter topical treatments can stop or help lessen excessive sweating in men. The most important over-the-counter medication men can use is called antiperspirant. It is a type of topical medication that temporarily lowers the skin’s ability to produce sweat. It can be tricky to find the right type of antiperspirant for the groin, especially because it can cause irritation. However, there are solutions and antiperspirants can be quite helpful.[4]

      Aside from antiperspirant, powders like baby powder (talcum) powder or cornstarch powder can be applied to the groin to help with sweating. These powders absorb moisture, prevent chafing, and ease irritation. Talcum powder has been linked to ovarian cancer, but this is not an issue for men. Combining over-the-counter methods may lead to the largest benefit.[4]

      Medical Treatments

      If more conservative measures don’t stop excessive sweating in men, then they can pursue medical treatment options. There are oral medications that can be prescribed to reduce sweat production, but they often have undesirable systemic side effects. Doctors usually prescribe a class of medications called anticholinergics that prevent the body from producing sweat. They occasionally prescribe antidepressants or anxiolytics if they believe there is a psychiatric component to sweating.[2]

      One of the most promising treatments used to decrease the production of groin sweat is the use of botox injections. Botox is injected into the skin of the problem areas and it prevents sweat production. To be clear, botox is not injected directly into sweaty balls, so don’t worry about that. Results can last for more than three months in most cases. Botox has very few side effects and is quite effective for this type of hyperhidrosis.[2]

      Finally, there are surgical treatments available to treat hyperhidrosis, but they usually are not a good option for issues with groin sweat. Usually excision of sweat glands is used, but this can be risky for the sensitive tissue in the groin region.[2]

      If you are a man struggling with groin sweat, it is worth your time to investigate the treatment options available. It can greatly improve your quality of life and reduce the symptoms you have to live with on a daily basis.

      Sources
      1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
      2. Hexsel, D. M., Dal'Forno, T. D., & Hexsel, C. L. (2004). Inguinal, or Hexsel’s Hyperhidrosis. Clinics in Dermatology, 22, 53-59. Retrieved June 27, 2019, from https://www.sweathelp.org/pdf/Hexsel.pdf
      3. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? (n.d.). Retrieved July 1, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs
      4. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved July 1, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
      Try Carpe today, and together, let’s stand up to sweat!