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Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

How to Stop Groin Sweat: 10 Ways to Deal with Crotch Sweat

By JP Carter /

Unfortunately, some people have to deal with excessive crotch sweat on a daily basis. Many of the people who struggle with this issue suffer from a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis, a medical situation that causes excessive sweating to occur on specific parts of the body. However, just because you have a lot of groin sweat doesn’t necessarily imply that you have the condition.[1]

Whether or not you have hyperhidrosis, crotch sweat can be embarrassing and hard to deal with. Below are 10 ways that you stop groin sweat so that you can stay comfortable and dry.

Wear the Right Underwear

What you wear matters when it comes to excessive crotch sweat - especially what you wear under your clothes. It’s important for people who struggle with groin sweat to choose the right type of undergarments. This means not wearing overly tight underwear made of non-breathable materials like polyester and other types of stifling synthetic fabrics. The best types of underwear for those with sweat issues are made of cotton or moisture wicking materials. Cotton is a breathable type of fabric that allows moisture to evaporate off of skin. Moisture wicking fabrics take this one step further and actually keep moisture away from the skin so that it stays dryer, longer. If you are struggling with extremely heavy sweating then you may want to invest in padded underwear which are made to absorb excess sweat and keep it from leaking out onto the outer layer of your clothing.[2]

Use Antiperspirant

Using antiperspirant is one of the most effective things you can do to stop crotch sweat production. Antiperspirant is a type of topical treatment for hyperhidrosis that changes the function of skin in such a way that it stops it from producing sweat. Due to the way it affects the body antiperspirant is considered to be a drug and is regulated by the FDA.[3] You can find a large variety of antiperspirants over-the-counter and they are meant to be applied topically. Antiperspirant works best when it is applied after a shower to dry skin before bed time, this allows it to sink into sweat glands and form a barrier that will be effective the next day. It can be hard to choose the right over-the-counter antiperspirant so talk to your doctor if you are not sure which product you should try.[1]

Use Hygiene Hacks

It is essential that people with crotch sweat use hygienic practices to their advantage. It is recommended that people who sweat excessively change take showers twice a day if possible. However, this can be time consuming and isn’t realistic for everyone. If you can’t shower frequently then it is a good idea to change your clothes any time sweating becomes excessive and wash your groin in between changes. Even though washing will not stop your sweating it will reduce odor build up, prevent skin breakdown, and make you more comfortable. It is a good idea to keep baby wipes and extra underwear with you for quick clean up sessions on the go. [2][4]

Apply Powder

Once you have cleaned your groin after a bout of intense sweating, it may be beneficial to apply powder. There are a few types of powder that can be useful when you have crotch sweat but they all serve to absorb moisture, reduce irritation, prevent chafing, and reduce itching. It’s important to avoid powders that contain talc as it has been associated with the development of ovarian cancer when used by women. However, there are powders with bases like cornstarch or baking soda, among others.[5] Some brands, like Carpe, make powders that are specifically formulated for use on the groin and are considered to be safe.[6]

Groom to Your Advantage

While grooming your pubic region will not completely hinder crotch sweat production it may lessen how much you produce and make it easier to keep clean. Retaining some pubic hair may be to your advantage as it has the ability to reduce friction between clothing and skin and wick moisture away from the skin’s surface. However, keeping hair short and trimmed is recommended because this makes it less likely for bacteria, which are responsible for body odor, to stay trapped on the surface of the skin. It also makes your groin easier to clean so that hygienic practices are more effective.[2]

Wear Loose Fitting Clothing

This one may seem obvious, but wearing loose fitting clothing can make you less likely to sweat and keep the sweat you do produce from lingering on your skin. Tight fitting pants will raise the temperature of your groin and make crotch sweat worse. They can also create more friction and make you more uncomfortable. This applies to underwear as well, men may want to opt for boxers instead of briefs and women should probably avoid skin tight panties.[2]

Try Relaxation Techniques

For some people, anxiety can make groin sweating worse.[2] It is also known that anxiety is related to hyperhidrosis and relaxation techniques have had some success in helping people to control their symptoms[1]. You may want to try biofeedback, mediation, yoga, or another type of relaxation activity to relax your mind and body. Relaxation by itself will not cure hyperhidrosis, but it can improve the symptoms and help you deal with the repercussions of having a stressful condition.

Get Botox Injections

When more conservative approaches have failed, it may be time to seek out medical intervention. Botox injections are known to stop the production of sweat and have successfully been used to treat crotch sweat. They are used to treat excessive sweating on other parts of the body like the armpits, hands, and feet. The effects of botox injections last between three and six months and they have been highly effective for some who use them. If you are interested in trying botox then make an appointment with a knowledgeable dermatologist.[1]

Try Oral Medications

Some doctors will prescribe medications to stop the body from producing as much sweat. Usually these medications come from a class of medications called anticholinergics. They can be helpful for some people but have the potential to cause undesirable side effects like dry mouth, constipation, nausea, drowsiness, and many others. This is because oral medications affect the whole body rather than just target the specific problem area. In some cases doctors may use antidepressants, beta blockers, or benzodiazepines to reduce anxiety and therefore improve the symptoms of hyperhidrosis.[1]

Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle

Sometimes excessive sweating can be worsened by a person’s lifestyle. This can be due to the fact that a person is obese, has a poorly treated underlying medical condition, or if they consume too much alcohol or caffeine. The symptoms of hyperhidrosis, or sweating in general, can be improved by taking steps to remedy these issues. If someone is obese, losing weight may help and if someone is driniking too much caffeine or alcohol reducing consumption can make a difference. If you think your sweating is due to an untreated medical condition then it is imperative that you speak with your doctor. Receiving proper treatment may solve several of your health issues.[2]

Dealing with excessive crotch sweat is frustrating and sometimes people feel like there isn’t much they can do. These tips and tricks may help. Try them out so that you can get on with your life not worry about sweating down there.

Sources
  1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
  2. Sweaty Vagina: Why It Happens and What You Can Do. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/sweaty-vagina#wicking-underwear
  3. Zirwas, M. J., & Moennich, J. (2008). Antiperspirant and Deodorant Allergy Diagnosis and Management. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 1(3), 38-43. Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013594/
  4. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs#overview
  5. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
  6. Carpe Takes Aim At Groin Sweat, Launches Groin Powder With Precision Lever Sprayer. (2019, May 22). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from http://classifieds.usatoday.com/press/carpe-takes-aim-at-groin-sweat-launches-groin-powder-with-precision-lever-sprayer/
Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

How Can Men Stop Excessive Groin Sweating?

By JP Carter /

Excessive groin sweating can be an especially uncomfortable problem for men - sweaty balls are no joke. Luckily, there are many effective treatment options available. The type of treatment a person needs depends on the cause of their sweating. Many times, excessive sweating in men, especially groin sweating, is caused by a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis.[1]

Primary focal hyperhidrosis usually develops during puberty and can last for a lifetime. It usually affects specific areas of the body including the hands, feet, face, armpits, and sometimes, the groin. When primary hyperhidrosis affects the groin it is medically referred to as Hexsel’s hyperhidrosis.[1] Excessive groin sweating caused by primary focal hyperhidrosis affects both men and women equally.[2] However, excessive sweating in men causes different secondary issues when it affects the groin because their anatomy is different than women.

Sometimes, excessive groin sweating is caused by a condition called secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis tends to come on suddenly and it is caused by an underlying medical issue or as a side effect of a medication. Secondary hyperhidrosis affects both men and women, but there are some issues that cause it to occur in women that men will not have to deal with. Treatment for secondary hyperhidrosis consists of treating the underlying condition that’s causing the excessive sweating.[1] Here are some conditions that can cause groin sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis:

  • Diabetes
  • Hormone imbalances
  • Low blood sugar
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Medication
  • Withdrawal
  • Several types of infections and other medical conditions[3]

Treatment Options for Men

Sweaty balls are no fun - they’re downright uncomfortable! The good news is that there are several effective treatment options men can use to get their groin sweat under control. Below are several choices you can try out if you are struggling with sweat.

Lifestyle Adjustments

In some cases, lifestyle adjustments can make a big difference when trying to lessen excessive sweating in men. It often won’t completely solve the issue, but it can help.

First of all, the type of underwear you use can make a big difference. It is best to opt for boxers that are made out of breathable cotton instead of briefs or boxer briefs. This is because sweaty balls need proper ventilation.

Secondly, it is imperative to maintain proper hygiene. This means washing the groin with warm water and soap at least once a day, or twice if sweat has had time to accumulate. Otherwise, men can develop problems like chafing, itching, bacterial infections, and fungal infections. This is how many athletes get jock itch.[4]

Finally, losing extra weight, eating healthy, and limiting your consumption of beverages like coffee and alcohol can also improve the amount of groin sweat men produce.[4]

Over-the-Counter Treatments

Many over-the-counter topical treatments can stop or help lessen excessive sweating in men. The most important over-the-counter medication men can use is called antiperspirant. It is a type of topical medication that temporarily lowers the skin’s ability to produce sweat. It can be tricky to find the right type of antiperspirant for the groin, especially because it can cause irritation. However, there are solutions and antiperspirants can be quite helpful.[4]

Aside from antiperspirant, powders like baby powder (talcum) powder or cornstarch powder can be applied to the groin to help with sweating. These powders absorb moisture, prevent chafing, and ease irritation. Talcum powder has been linked to ovarian cancer, but this is not an issue for men. Combining over-the-counter methods may lead to the largest benefit.[4]

Medical Treatments

If more conservative measures don’t stop excessive sweating in men, then they can pursue medical treatment options. There are oral medications that can be prescribed to reduce sweat production, but they often have undesirable systemic side effects. Doctors usually prescribe a class of medications called anticholinergics that prevent the body from producing sweat. They occasionally prescribe antidepressants or anxiolytics if they believe there is a psychiatric component to sweating.[2]

One of the most promising treatments used to decrease the production of groin sweat is the use of botox injections. Botox is injected into the skin of the problem areas and it prevents sweat production. To be clear, botox is not injected directly into sweaty balls, so don’t worry about that. Results can last for more than three months in most cases. Botox has very few side effects and is quite effective for this type of hyperhidrosis.[2]

Finally, there are surgical treatments available to treat hyperhidrosis, but they usually are not a good option for issues with groin sweat. Usually excision of sweat glands is used, but this can be risky for the sensitive tissue in the groin region.[2]

If you are a man struggling with groin sweat, it is worth your time to investigate the treatment options available. It can greatly improve your quality of life and reduce the symptoms you have to live with on a daily basis.

Sources
  1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
  2. Hexsel, D. M., Dal'Forno, T. D., & Hexsel, C. L. (2004). Inguinal, or Hexsel’s Hyperhidrosis. Clinics in Dermatology, 22, 53-59. Retrieved June 27, 2019, from https://www.sweathelp.org/pdf/Hexsel.pdf
  3. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? (n.d.). Retrieved July 1, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs
  4. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved July 1, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

What Causes Excessive Sweating on my Head and Face?

By Chris Reid /

Do you struggle with a sweaty face and head? If so, you’re not alone. According to an article published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, about 22.8% of people who have excessive sweating deal with sweating on their face and head.[1] An excessive sweating face can be an embarrassing problem to deal with. So, what causes excessive sweating on the face and head? Sometimes it can be the result of intense heat or exercise, but if you are sweating profusely for no obvious reason - you may likely be dealing with a form of hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is just a big word to describe sweating more than your body needs in order to regulate your temperature and stay healthy.

The type of hyperhidrosis that affects the face and head is medically known as craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Craniofacial sweating usually happens on the forehead, scalp, nose, chin, and sometimes cheeks. If you have hyperhidrosis, your sweating may be influenced by levels of anxiety and stress - but often (and somewhat frustratingly) it may have no obvious cause.[1] There are three types of hyperhidrosis that are known to cause excessive sweating of the face and head: primary focal hyperhidrosis, secondary generalized hyperhidrosis, and gustatory sweating (Frey’s syndrome).

The Causes of Excessive Face and Head Sweating

Primary Focal Hyperhidrosis

One of the most common causes of facial and head sweating is called primary focal hyperhidrosis. It is a condition that causes people to sweat in excess of what is needed by their body. Primary hyperhidrosis affects specific parts of the body like the hands, feet, underarms, and face. About 7 million people in the US have hyperhidrosis, so the condition is quite common.[2] And of the folks who have primary focal hyperhidrosis, about 22.8% have craniofacial hyperhidrosis (meaning they specifically have issues with excessive facial and head sweating).[1] Researchers aren’t exactly sure why primary focal hyperhidrosis occurs, but they suspect that it is caused by an overactive nervous system.

The sympathetic nervous system activates the sweat glands and is responsible for the “fight or flight” response. When the sympathetic system is activated at inappropriate times it can cause sweat glands to become overactive.[3] Hyperhidrosis is suspected to be somewhat hereditary.[2] So, if you have primary hyperhidrosis you may also have relatives with the same condition.

Secondary Generalized Hyperhidrosis

An excessive sweating face and head can also be caused by another type of hyperhidrosis called secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. It is usually characterized by sweating that occurs all over the body due to an underlying condition. This means that if you have secondary hyperhidrosis, there is another health condition or medication that is causing your excessive sweating. Secondary hyperhidrosis usually begins suddenly during adulthood, as opposed to primary focal hyperhidrosis, which typically develops during adolescence. You can experience excessive facial and head sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis, but if you have this condition you will most likely also experience excessive sweating on other parts of your body at the same time. It is important to seek medical attention if you think you have secondary hyperhidrosis (and don’t know the cause), because it can be the result of an underlying factor. There are certain diseases and conditions that cause secondary hyperhidrosis, which range from benign to more serious. There are also manymedications that can also cause secondary hyperhidrosis as a side effect.[2] If you think you have secondary hyperhidrosis, don’t panic, but please talk to your doctor so you can get more information and take control of your sweat.

Gustatory Sweating (Frey’s Syndrome)

Most people will never have to deal with this condition, but it can be a surprising cause of an excessively sweating face. Unlike primary focal hyperhidrosis and secondary generalized hyperhidrosis, gustatory sweating is quite uncommon. Gustatory sweating is when you experience excessive sweating and flushing on your face when you’re eating. It can even happen as a result of someone thinking about food! It is most often caused by an injury to the parotid gland and its associated nerves. This little known gland is located near the sides of the face and can be affected by an injury to those areas. After an injury those nerves struggle to regrow in the proper place and communication signals are affected. Essentially, the body responds inappropriately to stimuli after an injury or disease damages the nerves. It is unlikely that gustatory sweating is the cause of your sweating woes, but if these symptoms sound familiar you should check with your doctor and find out. [2]

Regardless of which type of hyperhidrosis is causing you to struggle with excessive facial and head sweating, remember you are not alone! We are here for you. Thankfully, there are effective ways to reduce and stop facial sweating so that it doesn’t have as big of an impact on your quality of life.

Sources
  1. Nicholas, R., Quddus, A., & Baker, D. M. (2015). Treatment of Primary Craniofacial Hyperhidrosis: A Systematic Review. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 16(5), 361-370. doi:10.1007/s40257-015-0136-6 Retrieved March 14, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26055729
  2. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
  3. Huddle, J. R. (2014). Hyperhidrosis: Causes, Treatment Options and Outcomes. New York, NY: Nova Science. Retrieved from https://www.bookdepository.com/Hyperhidrosis-Janine-R-Huddle/9781633215160
Causes of Hyperhidrosis

Hot Flashes, Menopause, and Sweating

By Katie Crissman /

Everyone will experience the effects of aging as they get older, but only 50% of the population will go on to deal with the symptoms and changes that occur with menopause. Menopause is a natural part of the aging process for women and it usually begins some time in a woman’s 40s, although it can occur a few years earlier or later. It is the process that occurs when a woman’s fertility begins to decline and she is no longer able to bear children or experience a period. There are three distinct phases of menopause: perimenopause, menopause, and postmenopause. Perimenopause is the first stage of menopause in which women begin ovulating less frequently and they often experience less frequent periods and physical symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, trouble sleeping, and other hormonal shifts. Menopause officially begins when a woman hasn’t had a period for 12 consecutive months.[1]

Menopause can be a frustrating time for many women because of the physical side effects that occur as a result, especially hot flashes and night sweats. As many as 75% of women will experience hot flashes at some point during perimenopause and menopause, making it a very common symptom. Hot flashes can feel intense and last anywhere from one to five minutes each. Their frequency varies for each woman, some only experience a few a week while others have several hot flashes a day. Some women will also experience night sweats - bouts of intense sweating that only occur during sleep. While hot flashes and night sweats may sound benign, they can be incredibly frustrating, and even debilitating, for some people.[2]

What Causes Hot Flashes and Night Sweats?

No one is entirely sure what causes hot flashes and night sweats to occur, but most doctors agree that it most likely has something to do with fluctuating, and often decreasing estrogen levels that menopausal women experience. Researchers suspect that dropping estrogen levels affect the part of the brain that controls temperature. The body has an acceptable window of what a person’s normal internal temperature can be and it is suspected that decreasing levels of estrogen make this window more narrow. This means that external temperatures can more easily cause a rise in body temperature. Sweating is the body’s natural way of cooling itself down. So, when a woman’s body senses that her internal temperature has risen more than it should it reacts by dilating blood vessels and sweating. This is when a woman experiences a hot flash.[2]

There are a few other theories about the causes of hot flashes and night sweats, although they are not currently proven. The first theory suggests that some women have especially sensitive skin during this time which makes them more prone to experiencing vasodilation and sweating. The second implies that menopause causes an imbalance in the hormone leptin which can in turn cause blood sugar imbalances. These blood sugar imbalances are then thought to cause hot flashes, and possibly night sweats. No matter what the cause, night sweats and hot flashes are hard to deal with![2]

Interestingly, hot flashes and night sweats are considered to be a type of secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. This means that they are a type of excessive sweating that is caused by an underlying medical state or condition. Luckily, there are several medical and practical solutions for this type of sweating. The most effective treatments focus on eliminating the underlying cause while others aim to minimize symptoms and reduce their impact on a person’s quality of life.[3]

Medications that Can Help

There are a few medical treatments that can help women who experience hot flashes. The most effective treatment is called menopause hormone therapy (MHT), it is also sometimes known as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This type of therapy consists of patients taking a combination of hormones, most often estrogen and progesterone, to keep their hormone levels stable while they are going through menopause. It can greatly reduce symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, irritability, vaginal dryness, and sleep problems. Unfortunately, MHT can be dangerous for some women and it can cause alarming side effects in others. Studies have shown that women using hormone replacement therapy are at an increased risk of developing heart attack, stroke, and blood clots. This is similar to the risk women take when they use hormonal birth control, but the effects can be more likely to occur in women of a more advanced age. Some evidence suggests that non oral forms of hormone replacement may reduce the risk of blood clots and stroke.[1][2]

Some other medications can be used for women who can take hormones. SSRIs, which are normally used to treat depression, can be taken in a lower dose to reduce sweating in some people. Ironically, SSRIs can also be a cause of secondary hyperhidrosis in some people so watch out for increased sweating if you choose to try them. Another medication used to treat seizures called Neurontin can be beneficial for some. Finally, a medication called clonidine which is normally used to treat high blood pressure can be useful in reducing symptoms for some people.[2]

Other Ways to Improve Symptoms

While medications work well for some people, others prefer to treat their symptoms naturally. There are several practical things you can do to reduce the severity and frequency of hot flashes and night sweats. Here are some solutions that may help you:

  • Lose weight: Studies have shown that overweight women who lost weight had a lower frequency of hot flashes than those who did not.
  • Exercise: This is not confirmed by a study, but it is suspected that exercise lessens the amount of hot flashes people experience.
  • Stop smoking: Smoking is related to a higher frequency of hot flashes, so reducing or quitting can have a positive effect.
  • Avoid trigger foods and beverages: Caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods have been shown to trigger excessive sweating.
  • Use other strategies to manage sweat: Use other means to manage your sweat like dressing in layers, staying in cooler temperatures, and avoiding stress.[2]
  • Some people have claimed success when they use certain supplements or employ dietary changes. Eating more soy is thought to reduce hot flashes, although this is currently not supported by studies. Other supplements like DHEA, dong quai, ginseng, kava, and red clover have been used by some to manage symptoms. However, no scientific evidence has yet backed the claims that these supplements work up as of yet. Any time you decide to use supplements it is important to consult a doctor and they can cause side effects and interact with other medications.[2]

    Sources
    1. Scaccia, A. (2018, May 16). How Long Do Symptoms of Menopause Last? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/menopause/how-long-does-menopause-last
    2. Suszynski, M. (n.d.). Menopause and Sweating. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/menopause/features/menopause-sweating-11#1
    3. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
    4. Santoro, N., pperson, C. N., & Mathews, S. B. (2016). Menopausal Symptoms and Their Management. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am., 44(3), 497–515. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890704/
    Causes of Hyperhidrosis

    Essential Facts About Hot Flashes, Menopause, and Sweating

    By Chris Reid /

    Menopause is a universal experience for all women who have a menstrual cycle. As if years of dealing with a period weren’t stressful enough, menopause brings its own batch of bodily changes and experiences. Menopause and sweat have an unfortunate link. Some of the most notorious symptoms that menopause causes are hot flashes, night sweats, and excessive sweating. These symptoms can be difficult to deal with for some and downright debilitating for others. If you or someone you love is struggling to deal with these specific symptoms then read on to learn these crucial facts about menopause and sweating.

    #1: About 75% of women going through menopause will experience hot flashes and night sweats.

    Sweating is one of the first and most common indications of impending menopause. As many as 75% of women who are in perimenopause or menopause will experience hot flashes and night sweats to varying degrees. This means these symptoms affect more women more often than not, making them very common. What’s more concerning is that for 25% to 30% of the women who experience hot flashes and night sweats the symptoms will be so severe that they interfere with their quality of life. Luckily, for those with severe symptoms due to menopause and sweating there are effective treatments that can help.[1]

    #2: Doctors think that hot flashes and excessive sweating associated with menopause is caused by decreasing levels of estrogen, but there are a few other theories as well.

    Once menstrual cycles stop women experience a dramatic drop in the level of estrogen in their body. This drop in estrogen is thought to affect the part of the brain that regulates body temperature in such a way that even small changes in external temperature can cause a core rise in body heat. Sweating is the body’s natural way of keeping itself cool so the body begins the process of sending blood to the skin and sweating when its core temperature increases. Hot flashes are essentially your body’s way of trying to cool itself down and keeping your internal temperature stable.[1]

    No one is really sure what causes the relationship between menopause and sweating. So naturally, there are a few other theories about what causes menopausal women to experience hot flashes. One theory suggests that women have super sensitive skin during this time in life which makes them more prone to vasodilation (blood vessels opening up) and hot flashes. Another theory holds that a brain chemical imbalance is at play. The level of a hormone called leptin (a hormone that influences appetite) can be affected during menopause in addition to blood sugar levels. Some think that these hormonal shifts may lead to hot flashes.[1]

    #3: Menopause begins once you haven’t had a period for 12 months in a row - but hot flashes and night sweats can begin much sooner.

    Menopause occurs in three stages: perimenopause, menopause, and postmenopause. Perimenopause is the first stage. During this stage, the body begins to produce less estrogen (a sex hormone) which is when menopause and sweating symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats begin. This process typically starts some time during a woman’s 40’s, but it can begin as early as a woman’s late 30’s. Menopause comes next. This stage starts when a woman hasn’t had a period for 12 months in a row. Generally this is when hot flashes and night sweats actually tend to subside, although the time frame is different for each woman. Postmenopause is the third stage and most women will no longer have significant symptoms once they reach it.[2]

    #4: Hot flashes and excessive sweating related to menopause can last for a long time. The average time women experience perimenopause symptoms is 4 years!

    Hot flashes and night sweats seem to peak during perimenopause (the first stage of menopause). It is thought that perimenopause lasts for around four years in the average woman. One research study found that women with moderate to severe hot flashes struggled with them for a median of 10.2 years! This is a longer timeframe than is generally thought to occur (thankfully). If you are dealing with hot flashes it could be a while before your body adjusts to its new normal and they taper off.[2]

    #5: The excessive sweating associated with menopause is actually considered to be a form of secondary hyperhidrosis and it can be treated.

    Hot flashes, night sweats, and excessive sweating are considered to be normal physiological changes that occur during menopause. However, it may be interesting to note that the excessive sweating caused by menopause is considered to be a type of secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Secondary hyperhidrosis is just a medical term for excessive sweating that is caused by an underlying physiological condition, disease, or medication side effect.[3] It may be beneficial to look into some of the ways that people deal with hyperhidrosis when learning how to cope with persistent menopause and sweating symptoms. Companies like Carpe, make antiperspirant lotions that can reduce sweating production and make you more comfortable.

    #6: Menopause Hormone Therapy (MHT) and other medications can be used to treat hot flashes, night sweats, and excessive sweating.

    Menopause hormone therapy consists of replacing a woman’s lowered levels of the sex hormone estrogen with artificial estrogen. This type of treatment is the most effective way to reduce symptoms of hot flashes and night sweats. Unfortunately, it is associated with a higher risk of developing heart disease, blood clots, stroke, and breast cancer. The longer a person uses hormone therapy the higher their risk of developing a health problem. There are also other medications that can be used to treat symptoms such as gabapentin, clonidine, and SSRI’s. Each medication has its own potential benefits and drawbacks, so speak with your doctor if you are struggling with symptoms and considering treatment.[1][2]

    #7: Hot flashes were thought to be associated with negative mood symptoms during menopause, but that has changed.

    Several years ago researchers thought that the development of hot flashes were associated with depression that can accompany menopause. It has recently been found that depression typically occurs before the development of hot flashes if it is going to occur as a result of menopause. So, just because you have hot flashes does not mean you will also get depression. Some women struggle with depression as a side effect of fluctuating hormones during menopause which can also make other physiological symptoms more difficult to deal with.[4]

    #8: There are non medical ways to manage menopausal sweating.

    There are several ways to manage hot flashes and night sweats that don’t involve medications. While there is no conclusive scientific evidence, some people believe that supplements like black cohosh, DHEA, dong quai, ginseng, kava, red clover, and soy are beneficial in relieving symptoms.[1] You can also use practical strategies to manage your sweat like avoiding caffeine and alcohol, staying in cool environments when possible, dressing in layers, keeping your bedroom cool, and using over-the-counter topical products like antiperspirant. Even though these changes might seem small they can make menopause and sweating more manageable.[2]

    Sources
    1. Suszynski, M. (n.d.). Menopause and Sweating. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/menopause/features/menopause-sweating-11#1
    2. Scaccia, A. (2018, May 16). How Long Do Symptoms of Menopause Last? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/menopause/how-long-does-menopause-last
    3. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
    4. Santoro, N., pperson, C. N., & Mathews, S. B. (2016). Menopausal Symptoms and Their Management. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am., 44(3), 497–515. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890704/
    Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

    What are the Causes of Groin Sweat?

    By Katie Crissman /

    Sweating is a normal, healthy occurrence if it helps your body to cool itself down. However, some people experience excessive sweating that is burdensome rather than beneficial. This is especially problematic when sweat accumulates on certain parts of the body - like the groin. If you experience the following symptoms it could be a sign that your groin sweating has become excessive and may require some intervention:

  • Chafing
  • Itching
  • Irritation
  • Bad odor or negative changes in body odor
  • Sweating disrupts you daily routine
  • You regularly soak through your undergarments and/or pants
  • So, what causes this type of unsettling groin sweat production? There are many possible culprits. Keep reading to learn about the most common causes![1][2]

    Primary Focal Hyperhidrosis

    Hyperhidrosis is the medical term used to describe unusual, excessive sweating that is not related to the heat or exertion. The two most common types of hyperhidrosis are called primary focal hyperhidrosis and secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Most commonly, night sweats are a symptom of secondary hyperhidrosis - which is a type of hyperhidrosis caused by an underlying medical condition or medication. For example, some medications cause excessive sweating as a side effect. Due to the fact that the excessive sweating has a causative agent, the medication, a person would be said to have secondary hyperhidrosis. In contrast, primary focal hyperhidrosis develops earlier on in life and has no causative factor.[3] While primary focal hyperhidrosis could potentially cause night sweats, this is much less common.[1] The other causes of night sweats discussed in this article are actually types of secondary generalized hyperhidrosis.

    Pregnancy and Menopause

    One of the most common causes of excessive groin sweating is called primary focal hyperhidrosis (PFH). Hyperhidrosis is a skin disorder that causes sweating to occur in excess of what is needed by the body for normal physiological functioning. Most of the time, primary focal hyperhidrosis affects specific areas of the body like the hands, feet, armpits, face, and less commonly, the groin. A specific type of PFH called Hexsel’s hyperhidrosis is used to describe the condition when hyperhidrosis specifically affects the inguinal (groin) region. People with this type of hyperhidrosis usually struggle with sweating on the upper thighs, suprapubic area, external genitalia, gluteal folds, and the gluteal cleft. Sweating can become so severe that patients often experience soaking their clothes and deal with embarrassing situations as a result.[3]

    Researchers aren’t sure how many people struggle with primary focal hyperhidrosis that causes excessive groin sweating. It is thought to be less than the population of people that have hyperhidrosis that affects other parts of the body. One retrospective chart review published in the journal of Dermatologic Clinics observed that only 1.3% of the patients reviewed experienced groin sweating. It is known that about 50% of patients who have Hexsel’s hyperhidrosis have a family history of the condition, leading doctors to believe that there is at least some heritable component to hyperhidrosis. No one is sure why people develop primary focal hyperhidrosis, but it typically begins during puberty and can affect a person over their lifetime. While there is no cure for hyperhidrosis, there are ways to stop or decrease groin sweating.[3]

    Secondary Generalized Hyperhidrosis

    Secondary generalized hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that is caused by an underlying factor like a medical condition or medication. Typically the sweating from this type of hyperhidrosis causes sweating to occur evenly all over the body and it can appear suddenly during any stage of life. Secondary hyperhidrosis is not known to only affect the groin area, but it can certainly cause excessive groin sweating. People with this type of hyperhidrosis often also experience night sweating in contrast to those with primary focal hyperhidrosis.[3]

    There are several possible causes of secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Below is a list of conditions that could possibly cause secondary hyperhidrosis:

  • Menopause
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • Pregnancy
  • Certain infections
  • Some cancers
  • Anxiety disorder or stress
  • Hormonal imbalances
  • Medications (antidepressants, painkillers, antibiotics, some cold medications, and many others)
  • Hyperthyroidism[1]
  • There are several other factors that can cause secondary hyperhidrosis, some of which are benign and others that are medically serious. Therefore, if you think you might have secondary hyperhidrosis it is important that you speak to a doctor about the potential causes. Luckily, secondary hyperhidrosis can be fixed by treating the underlying condition or stopping the medication that is causing it.[3]

    Other Factors

    While lifestyle factors aren’t going to cause excessive groin sweating to the point of needing medical attention, they can make a bad problem worse. You might be experiencing increased groin sweat production if you are wearing underwear that are tight, constricting, or made of fabrics with moisture-retentive properties. As unimportant as this may seem, it can actually be an important factor for some people. Exercise is another reason some people experience excessive groin sweating. So, if your sweat is only an issue after you are physically active then you probably don’t have a problem but you may want to dress accordingly. Finally, other lifestyle factors like obesity and pubic grooming can lead to differences in sweat production.[4]

    If you are struggling with excessive groin sweat then don’t give up! It can be difficult to find a treatment that works for you, but there are options available. There are treatments that allow patients to control groin sweat and that will help you to move on from the stress that excessive sweating causes.

    Sources
    1. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? (n.d.). Retrieved August 14, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs
    2. Sweating and body odor. (2017, February 14). Retrieved August 14, 2019, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sweating-and-body-odor/symptoms-causes/syc-20353895
    3. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
    4. Eske, J. (2018, November 16). What causes sweating around the vagina? Retrieved August 14, 2019, from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323719.php
    Try Carpe today, and together, let’s stand up to sweat!