SWEATOPEDIA

Sweatopedia is a leading source of comprehensive, objective, and accurate information on hyperhidrosis.

MUST WATCH VIDEOS
Excessive Sweating of the Face and Head
By Katie Crissman /
Let's Talk About Sweat
By Chris Reid /
Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

How to Stop Groin Sweat: 10 Ways to Deal with Crotch Sweat

By JP Carter /

Unfortunately, some people have to deal with excessive crotch sweat on a daily basis. Many of the people who struggle with this issue suffer from a condition called primary focal hyperhidrosis, a medical situation that causes excessive sweating to occur on specific parts of the body. However, just because you have a lot of groin sweat doesn’t necessarily imply that you have the condition.[1]

Whether or not you have hyperhidrosis, crotch sweat can be embarrassing and hard to deal with. Below are 10 ways that you stop groin sweat so that you can stay comfortable and dry.

Wear the Right Underwear

What you wear matters when it comes to excessive crotch sweat - especially what you wear under your clothes. It’s important for people who struggle with groin sweat to choose the right type of undergarments. This means not wearing overly tight underwear made of non-breathable materials like polyester and other types of stifling synthetic fabrics. The best types of underwear for those with sweat issues are made of cotton or moisture wicking materials. Cotton is a breathable type of fabric that allows moisture to evaporate off of skin. Moisture wicking fabrics take this one step further and actually keep moisture away from the skin so that it stays dryer, longer. If you are struggling with extremely heavy sweating then you may want to invest in padded underwear which are made to absorb excess sweat and keep it from leaking out onto the outer layer of your clothing.[2]

Use Antiperspirant

Using antiperspirant is one of the most effective things you can do to stop crotch sweat production. Antiperspirant is a type of topical treatment for hyperhidrosis that changes the function of skin in such a way that it stops it from producing sweat. Due to the way it affects the body antiperspirant is considered to be a drug and is regulated by the FDA.[3] You can find a large variety of antiperspirants over-the-counter and they are meant to be applied topically. Antiperspirant works best when it is applied after a shower to dry skin before bed time, this allows it to sink into sweat glands and form a barrier that will be effective the next day. It can be hard to choose the right over-the-counter antiperspirant so talk to your doctor if you are not sure which product you should try.[1]

Use Hygiene Hacks

It is essential that people with crotch sweat use hygienic practices to their advantage. It is recommended that people who sweat excessively change take showers twice a day if possible. However, this can be time consuming and isn’t realistic for everyone. If you can’t shower frequently then it is a good idea to change your clothes any time sweating becomes excessive and wash your groin in between changes. Even though washing will not stop your sweating it will reduce odor build up, prevent skin breakdown, and make you more comfortable. It is a good idea to keep baby wipes and extra underwear with you for quick clean up sessions on the go. [2][4]

Apply Powder

Once you have cleaned your groin after a bout of intense sweating, it may be beneficial to apply powder. There are a few types of powder that can be useful when you have crotch sweat but they all serve to absorb moisture, reduce irritation, prevent chafing, and reduce itching. It’s important to avoid powders that contain talc as it has been associated with the development of ovarian cancer when used by women. However, there are powders with bases like cornstarch or baking soda, among others.[5] Some brands, like Carpe, make powders that are specifically formulated for use on the groin and are considered to be safe.[6]

Groom to Your Advantage

While grooming your pubic region will not completely hinder crotch sweat production it may lessen how much you produce and make it easier to keep clean. Retaining some pubic hair may be to your advantage as it has the ability to reduce friction between clothing and skin and wick moisture away from the skin’s surface. However, keeping hair short and trimmed is recommended because this makes it less likely for bacteria, which are responsible for body odor, to stay trapped on the surface of the skin. It also makes your groin easier to clean so that hygienic practices are more effective.[2]

Wear Loose Fitting Clothing

This one may seem obvious, but wearing loose fitting clothing can make you less likely to sweat and keep the sweat you do produce from lingering on your skin. Tight fitting pants will raise the temperature of your groin and make crotch sweat worse. They can also create more friction and make you more uncomfortable. This applies to underwear as well, men may want to opt for boxers instead of briefs and women should probably avoid skin tight panties.[2]

Try Relaxation Techniques

For some people, anxiety can make groin sweating worse.[2] It is also known that anxiety is related to hyperhidrosis and relaxation techniques have had some success in helping people to control their symptoms[1]. You may want to try biofeedback, mediation, yoga, or another type of relaxation activity to relax your mind and body. Relaxation by itself will not cure hyperhidrosis, but it can improve the symptoms and help you deal with the repercussions of having a stressful condition.

Get Botox Injections

When more conservative approaches have failed, it may be time to seek out medical intervention. Botox injections are known to stop the production of sweat and have successfully been used to treat crotch sweat. They are used to treat excessive sweating on other parts of the body like the armpits, hands, and feet. The effects of botox injections last between three and six months and they have been highly effective for some who use them. If you are interested in trying botox then make an appointment with a knowledgeable dermatologist.[1]

Try Oral Medications

Some doctors will prescribe medications to stop the body from producing as much sweat. Usually these medications come from a class of medications called anticholinergics. They can be helpful for some people but have the potential to cause undesirable side effects like dry mouth, constipation, nausea, drowsiness, and many others. This is because oral medications affect the whole body rather than just target the specific problem area. In some cases doctors may use antidepressants, beta blockers, or benzodiazepines to reduce anxiety and therefore improve the symptoms of hyperhidrosis.[1]

Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle

Sometimes excessive sweating can be worsened by a person’s lifestyle. This can be due to the fact that a person is obese, has a poorly treated underlying medical condition, or if they consume too much alcohol or caffeine. The symptoms of hyperhidrosis, or sweating in general, can be improved by taking steps to remedy these issues. If someone is obese, losing weight may help and if someone is driniking too much caffeine or alcohol reducing consumption can make a difference. If you think your sweating is due to an untreated medical condition then it is imperative that you speak with your doctor. Receiving proper treatment may solve several of your health issues.[2]

Dealing with excessive crotch sweat is frustrating and sometimes people feel like there isn’t much they can do. These tips and tricks may help. Try them out so that you can get on with your life not worry about sweating down there.

Sources
  1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Amsterdam: Elsevier Pub. Co., 2014. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
  2. Sweaty Vagina: Why It Happens and What You Can Do. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/sweaty-vagina#wicking-underwear
  3. Zirwas, M. J., & Moennich, J. (2008). Antiperspirant and Deodorant Allergy Diagnosis and Management. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 1(3), 38-43. Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013594/
  4. Is the Sweating Between My Legs Excessive? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/how-do-i-stop-sweating-between-my-legs#overview
  5. What Causes Excessive Testicular Sweating, and How Can I Treat It? (n.d.). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from https://www.healthline.com/health/what-causes-excessive-testicular-sweating-and-how-can-i-treat-it
  6. Carpe Takes Aim At Groin Sweat, Launches Groin Powder With Precision Lever Sprayer. (2019, May 22). Retrieved August 26, 2019, from http://classifieds.usatoday.com/press/carpe-takes-aim-at-groin-sweat-launches-groin-powder-with-precision-lever-sprayer/
Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

How to Stop Excessive Foot Sweating

By Katie Crissman /

While there is no exact standard as to how much foot sweat is too much in a 24 hour period, there are ways to determine whether you are sweating in excess of what is normal or not. It is normal to sweat from your feet during periods of intense activity and when exposed to high heat. However, many people struggle with a condition called hyperhidrosis which causes causes them to sweat excessively. Hyperhidrosis is defined as sweating that is in excess of what the body needs for thermoregulation. Typically, people sweat in order to cool down their body temperature, but when someone sweats so much that it is no longer serving this function it is considered to be excessive.[1]

There are two main types of hyperhidrosis: primary focal hyperhidrosis and secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. Both types can cause someone to have excessively sweaty feet, but primary focal hyperhidrosis is more likely to affect the feet. Primary focal hyperhidrosis causes excessive sweating on specific parts of the body like the hands, feet, armpits, face, and head. According to a retrospective chart review published in the Journal of Dermatologic Clinics, about 25% of people with hyperhidrosis have palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) involvement while only 15.5% of people have hyperhidrosis that only affects their feet. Even though that seems like a relatively small number of people, about 2.8% of the US population has hyperhidrosis so it is relatively high number of people who are affected.[1]

If you aren’t sure whether or not your foot sweating is excessive, there are certain signs that can alert you to whether or not you might have hyperhidrosis. People with hyperhidrosis can sweat up to four times more than the average person and this can have a negative on their quality of life.[2] Here are some ways that excessively sweaty feet may interfere with your life if you have a problem:

  • Your shoes are consistently soaked, stained, or destroyed by your constant production of sweat.
  • You have difficulties wearing flip flops, sandals, and slippers because the sweat on your feet causes them to be slippery.
  • You struggle to walk around barefoot because your feet are so wet.
  • You need to wear especially absorbent socks in order to keep your feet and shoes dry.
  • Your feet are often cold because of the constant presence of sweat.[1]
  • If you sweat so much from your feet that you are experiencing some or many of the symptoms listed above, you are probably sweating in excess of what is normal. Another way to determine whether you are sweating too much from your feet is to determine how it is affecting your life. If you think about your sweating frequently and often change your behaviors to deal with it, then you are probably sweating more than the average person. For example, if you refuse to wear flip flops because you know they won’t stay on your feet because of sweating, then you are sweating too much.[2]

    If you suspect that you have hyperhidrosis then it is a good idea to speak with a dermatologist, as the are the best type of doctors to treat hyperhidrosis. Doctors have several tools to measure whether you have hyperhidrosis. Most of the time, doctors will administer a type of questionnaire that asseses how much sweating is impacting a person’s life. One of these questionnaires is called the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). This questionnaire has patients rank their symptoms on a scale from 1 to 4, with higher scores corresponding to more severe symptoms. Doctors also use other types of self-reporting questionnaires to determine whether or not a patient has hyperhidrosis and to determine how severe it is.[1]

    There are also other types of tests that doctors can use to determine how much you are sweating, but they are not normally needed to assess whether or not someone has hyperhidrosis. These types of tests include the iodine-starch test, skin conductance, and a thermoregulatory sweat test.[3] An iodine starch test can be used to outline the area where excessive sweating is occuring. In this test an iodine solution is spread over the area in question and a few minutes later starch powder is sprinkled over the area. The starch and iodine interact in the presence of sweat and create a purplish color. This can tell the doctor how much a person is sweating and where the specific problem is. It also allows doctors to determine whether hyperhidrosis treatments, like botox injections, are working or not.[4] Skin conductance tests and thermoregulatory tests are not typically needed for a hyperhidrosis diagnosis, but they can help to determine how much sweat a person is producing.

    If you do find that you sweat more from your feet than is normal, there are many treatments for sweaty feet that you can look into. Treatments for hyperhidrosis tend to be quite effective, so talk to a doctor if your sweaty feet are getting you down.

    Sources
    1. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier
    2. Nguyen, A. (n.d.). How Much Sweating Is Excessive? Retrieved May 31, 2019, from https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/features/how-much-sweat-is-normal#1
    3. Hyperhidrosis. (n.d.). Retrieved May 31, 2019, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyperhidrosis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20367173
    4. Haider, A., & Solish, N. (2005). Focal hyperhidrosis: Diagnosis and management. CMAJ, 172(1), 69-75. Retrieved May 31, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC543948/
    Body Areas Affected by Hyperhidrosis

    What Causes Excessive Sweating on my Head and Face?

    By Chris Reid /

    Do you struggle with a sweaty face and head? If so, you’re not alone. According to an article published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, about 22.8% of people who have excessive sweating deal with sweating on their face and head.[1] An excessive sweating face can be an embarrassing problem to deal with. So, what causes excessive sweating on the face and head? Sometimes it can be the result of intense heat or exercise, but if you are sweating profusely for no obvious reason - you may likely be dealing with a form of hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is just a big word to describe sweating more than your body needs in order to regulate your temperature and stay healthy.

    The type of hyperhidrosis that affects the face and head is medically known as craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Craniofacial sweating usually happens on the forehead, scalp, nose, chin, and sometimes cheeks. If you have hyperhidrosis, your sweating may be influenced by levels of anxiety and stress - but often (and somewhat frustratingly) it may have no obvious cause.[1] There are three types of hyperhidrosis that are known to cause excessive sweating of the face and head: primary focal hyperhidrosis, secondary generalized hyperhidrosis, and gustatory sweating (Frey’s syndrome).

    The Causes of Excessive Face and Head Sweating

    Primary Focal Hyperhidrosis

    One of the most common causes of facial and head sweating is called primary focal hyperhidrosis. It is a condition that causes people to sweat in excess of what is needed by their body. Primary hyperhidrosis affects specific parts of the body like the hands, feet, underarms, and face. About 7 million people in the US have hyperhidrosis, so the condition is quite common.[2] And of the folks who have primary focal hyperhidrosis, about 22.8% have craniofacial hyperhidrosis (meaning they specifically have issues with excessive facial and head sweating).[1] Researchers aren’t exactly sure why primary focal hyperhidrosis occurs, but they suspect that it is caused by an overactive nervous system.

    The sympathetic nervous system activates the sweat glands and is responsible for the “fight or flight” response. When the sympathetic system is activated at inappropriate times it can cause sweat glands to become overactive.[3] Hyperhidrosis is suspected to be somewhat hereditary.[2] So, if you have primary hyperhidrosis you may also have relatives with the same condition.

    Secondary Generalized Hyperhidrosis

    An excessive sweating face and head can also be caused by another type of hyperhidrosis called secondary generalized hyperhidrosis. It is usually characterized by sweating that occurs all over the body due to an underlying condition. This means that if you have secondary hyperhidrosis, there is another health condition or medication that is causing your excessive sweating. Secondary hyperhidrosis usually begins suddenly during adulthood, as opposed to primary focal hyperhidrosis, which typically develops during adolescence. You can experience excessive facial and head sweating from secondary hyperhidrosis, but if you have this condition you will most likely also experience excessive sweating on other parts of your body at the same time. It is important to seek medical attention if you think you have secondary hyperhidrosis (and don’t know the cause), because it can be the result of an underlying factor. There are certain diseases and conditions that cause secondary hyperhidrosis, which range from benign to more serious. There are also manymedications that can also cause secondary hyperhidrosis as a side effect.[2] If you think you have secondary hyperhidrosis, don’t panic, but please talk to your doctor so you can get more information and take control of your sweat.

    Gustatory Sweating (Frey’s Syndrome)

    Most people will never have to deal with this condition, but it can be a surprising cause of an excessively sweating face. Unlike primary focal hyperhidrosis and secondary generalized hyperhidrosis, gustatory sweating is quite uncommon. Gustatory sweating is when you experience excessive sweating and flushing on your face when you’re eating. It can even happen as a result of someone thinking about food! It is most often caused by an injury to the parotid gland and its associated nerves. This little known gland is located near the sides of the face and can be affected by an injury to those areas. After an injury those nerves struggle to regrow in the proper place and communication signals are affected. Essentially, the body responds inappropriately to stimuli after an injury or disease damages the nerves. It is unlikely that gustatory sweating is the cause of your sweating woes, but if these symptoms sound familiar you should check with your doctor and find out. [2]

    Regardless of which type of hyperhidrosis is causing you to struggle with excessive facial and head sweating, remember you are not alone! We are here for you. Thankfully, there are effective ways to reduce and stop facial sweating so that it doesn’t have as big of an impact on your quality of life.

    Sources
    1. Nicholas, R., Quddus, A., & Baker, D. M. (2015). Treatment of Primary Craniofacial Hyperhidrosis: A Systematic Review. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 16(5), 361-370. doi:10.1007/s40257-015-0136-6 Retrieved March 14, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26055729
    2. Pariser, D. M. (2014). Hyperhidrosis (4th ed., Vol. 32). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier. Retrieved from https://www.elsevier.com/books/hyperhidrosis-an-issue-of-dermatologic-clinics/pariser/978-0-323-32607-0
    3. Huddle, J. R. (2014). Hyperhidrosis: Causes, Treatment Options and Outcomes. New York, NY: Nova Science. Retrieved from https://www.bookdepository.com/Hyperhidrosis-Janine-R-Huddle/9781633215160